Search Results for: julie lyon

JULIE LYON QUINTET at Dennings Point Distillery

JULIE LYON QUINTET

Julie Lyon – vocal, Pat Hall – trombone, Jack DeSalvo – guitar, Mark Hagan – double-bass, Tom Cabrera – drums, play Julie and Jack’s composition Hey There Baby in performance at Dennings Point Distillery in Beacon, NY from Julie’s album MOONFLOWER.

Listen to and get Julie’s UR albums at https://julielyon.bandcamp.com/

Julie Lyon Moonflower Release Party

JULIE LYON‘s new album MOONFLOWER, her follow-up to the critically acclaimed JULIE, features original songs and compositions and is in many ways her first solo album. Though accompanied by her band, the focus is not only on Ms. Lyon’s considerable vocal talents but also on her role as lyricist and songwriter. The seeds of MOONFLOWER were sown when Julie began to write lyrics to some of composer Jack DeSalvo’s music. It became obvious that recording this music would be the vocalist’s next project and music by Julie Lyon along with additional collaborations with Tom Cabrera and Betsy Serafin create a tapestry of sophisticated listening experiences with music touching new jazz, folk and world music but always rooted in Julie’s sense of swing and the blues. The title song MOONFLOWER is written by multi-instrumentalist/composer Matt Lavelle.

Moonflower_Inside_Left Julie

“Ms. Lyon shows that the she knows exactly what she is doing here and executes all of her songs exquisitely. She’s the real deal in her element here with a voice that is like a nice chianti – Smooth, subtle, complex, and a little playful. When she is singing, what you hear is not only the lyrics, but a visceral love of singing that shines through her instrument, very refreshing and appealing.” – Jonathan Shade, Night Life Exchange

Listen to NUVYU from JULIE LYON’s New Album MOONFLOWER

HD APPLE LOSSLESS DOWNLOAD

HD FLAC DOWNLOAD

APPLE LOSSLESS CD QUALITY DOWNLOAD

CD QUALITY FLAC DOWNLOAD

mp3 DOWNLOAD

JULIE LYON, vocals
Matt Lavelle, trumpet, alto clarinet
Jack DeSalvo, guitar. mandola
Todd Urban, double bass
Tom Cabrera, drums, cymbals, percussion

Recorded at Urban Sound by Todd Urban
Recorded, mixed, and mastered at Beanstudio by Jim DeSalvo
Design by Qua’s Eye Graphics

Produced by Jack DeSalvo

JULIE LYON – MOONFLOWER

moonflower_Front_w_logo

HD APPLE LOSSLESS DOWNLOAD

HD FLAC DOWNLOAD

APPLE LOSSLESS CD QUALITY DOWNLOAD

CD QUALITY FLAC DOWNLOAD

mp3 DOWNLOAD

JULIE LYON‘s new album MOONFLOWER, her follow-up to the critically acclaimed JULIE, features original songs and compositions and is in many ways her first solo album. Though accompanied by her band, the focus is not only on Ms. Lyon’s considerable vocal talents but also on her role as lyricist and songwriter. The seeds of MOONFLOWER were sown when Julie began to write lyrics to some of composer Jack DeSalvo’s music. It became obvious that recording this music would be the vocalist’s next project and music by Julie Lyon along with additional collaborations with Tom Cabrera and Betsy Serafin create a tapestry of sophisticated listening experiences with music touching new jazz, folk and world music but always rooted in Julie’s sense of swing and the blues. The title song MOONFLOWER is written by multi-instrumentalist/composer Matt Lavelle.


“Ms. Lyon shows that the she knows exactly what she is doing here and executes all of her songs exquisitely. She’s the real deal in her element here with a voice that is like a nice chianti – Smooth, subtle, complex, and a little playful. When she is singing, what you hear is not only the lyrics, but a visceral love of singing that shines through her instrument, very refreshing and appealing.” – Jonathan Shade, Night Life Exchange


MOONFLOWER

Having Found
It’s Raining Again
Pramantha
Hey There Baby
You Are the One
Nuvyu
MoonFlower
Chasing a Dream
Eternity
Prelude
Soul Dance

JULIE LYON, vocals
Matt Lavelle, trumpet, alto clarinet
Jack DeSalvo, guitar. mandola
Todd Urban, double bass
Tom Cabrera, drums, cymbals, percussion

Recorded at Urban Sound by Todd Urban
Recorded, mixed, and mastered at Beanstudio by Jim DeSalvo
Design by Qua’s Eye Graphics

Produced by Jack DeSalvo

UR9948.Mooflower_Back

JULIE LYON – MOONFLOWER Now Available on UNSEEN RAIN RECORDS

moonflower_Front_w_logo

HD APPLE LOSSLESS DOWNLOAD

HD FLAC DOWNLOAD

APPLE LOSSLESS CD QUALITY DOWNLOAD

CD QUALITY FLAC DOWNLOAD

mp3 DOWNLOAD

 

JULIE LYON‘s new album MOONFLOWER, her follow-up to the critically acclaimed JULIE, features original songs and compositions and is in many ways her first solo album. Though accompanied by her band, the focus is not only on Ms. Lyon’s considerable vocal talents but also on her role as lyricist and songwriter. The seeds of MOONFLOWER were sown when Julie began to write lyrics to some of composer Jack DeSalvo’s music. It became obvious that recording this music would be the vocalist’s next project and music by Julie Lyon along with additional collaborations with Tom Cabrera and Betsy Serafin create a tapestry of sophisticated listening experiences with music touching new jazz, folk and world music but always rooted in Julie’s sense of swing and the blues. The title song MOONFLOWER is written by multi-instrumentalist/composer Matt Lavelle.


“Ms. Lyon shows that the she knows exactly what she is doing here and executes all of her songs exquisitely. She’s the real deal in her element here with a voice that is like a nice chianti – Smooth, subtle, complex, and a little playful. When she is singing, what you hear is not only the lyrics, but a visceral love of singing that shines through her instrument, very refreshing and appealing.” – Jonathan Shade, Night Life Exchange


MOONFLOWER

Having Found
It’s Raining Again
Pramantha
Hey There Baby
You Are the One
Nuvyu
MoonFlower
Chasing a Dream
Eternity
Prelude
Soul Dance

JULIE LYON, vocals
Matt Lavelle, trumpet, alto clarinet
Jack DeSalvo, guitar. mandola
Todd Urban, double bass
Tom Cabrera, drums, cymbals, percussion

Recorded at Urban Sound by Todd Urban
Recorded, mixed, and mastered at Beanstudio by Jim DeSalvo
Design by Qua’s Eye Graphics

Produced by Jack DeSalvo

UR9948.Mooflower_Back

New JULIE LYON album MOONFLOWER available this week.

moonflower_Front_w_logo UR9948.Mooflower_Back

JULIE LYON‘s new album MOONFLOWER, featuring original songs and compositions, will be available this week as HD, CD-Quality and mp3 Downloads  at www.unseenrainrecords.com and www.meyefi.com.

“Ms. Lyon shows that the she knows exactly what she is doing here and executes all of her songs exquisitely. She’s the real deal in her element here with a voice that is like a nice chianti – Smooth, subtle, complex, and a little playful. When she is singing, what you hear is not only the lyrics, but a visceral love of singing that shines through her instrument, very refreshing and appealing.” – Jonathan Shade, Night Life Exchange

Julie Lyon EPK

Contact – Bio – Music – Videos – Gallery  – Reviews – Gigs

“The debut album of the Julie Lyon Quintet is the best cure for the blues.” – Leonid Auskern

 

Moonflower_Inside_Left Julie

“Ms. Lyon shows that the she knows exactly what she is doing here and executes all of her songs exquisitely. She’s the real deal in her element here with a voice that is like a nice chianti – Smooth, subtle, complex, and a little playful. When she is singing, what you hear is not only the lyrics, but a visceral love of singing that shines through her instrument, very refreshing and appealing.” – Jonathan Shade, nitelifeexchange.com

“Bobby Brennan has the band nailed in with his solid bass work, and Tom Cabrera’s drumming evokes mental images of Maynard G. Krebs standing by, fingers snapping, grin wreathing Fu Manchu’ed face, while Jack DeSalvo’s guitar is a mercurial presence, dashing in for a doo-wop quotation, then sliding back out again. Levelle, though is oft striking, as present and in the pocket as Lyon, he blazing (as in the trumpet work in Too Damn Hot) while she smile-sings seductively, caught between wanting to gambol in the sun, grab that martini on the sidebar, and/or wink at the guy who just strolled in, tan, lean, and mysterious.” – Mark S. Tucker, acousticmusic.com


JULIE LYON Website HERE

 

 

Julie – Julie Lyon Quintet (UR9957) Downloads

High Definition FLAC Download — $10.99

CD quality FLAC Download — $9.99

mp3 (VBR 44.1kHz maximum quality) — $8.99

Julie Lyon Quintet is the best cure for the bluesJulie will give you almost an hour of warm, sincere and very cozy jazz. This American vocalist and her partners do not seek to create some bold experiments, avant-garde delights or to display the power of the voice. The voice of Julie Lyon is not about free rein sound but rather depth of experience and the aura of the truth of jazz will not leave you from the first track to the last.” – Leonid Auskern, Jazzquad, Russia

Julie

  1. Love for Sale
  2. Bye Bye Blackbird
  3. Dindi
  4. Comes Love
  5. Everytime We Say Goodbye
  6. Too Damn Hot
  7. All or Nothing At All
  8. Born To Be Blue
  9. Strollin’
  10. Temptation

Julie Lyon Quartet
Julie Lyon, vocals • Tom Cabrera, drums and percussion • Matt Lavelle, trumpet and alto clarinet • Jack DeSalvo, guitars and mandola • Bobby Brennan, double-bass

Recorded May 23, 2013 at Tedesco Studio, Paramus, NJ
Engineered by Tom Tedesco
Mixed by Larry Hutter
Mastered by Jim DeSalvo at Beanstudio, Wayne, NJ

Executive producers: Gene Gaudette, Jim DeSalvo, Jack DeSalvo

Produced by Julie Lyon and Tom Cabrera

Unseen Rain UR-9957

Reviews of Julie – The Julie Lyon Quintet (UR9957)

Julie – The Julie Lyon Quintet


By: Mark S. Tucker, acousticmusic.com

“Perhaps the most interesting element in this recording is the ‘live in studio’ nature lending a great deal of atmosphere and beatnik cafe society vibe to the affair. Well, actually, I’m assuming it was thus live ’cause it sure as hell sounds it—if not, if there are overdubs and such, then Tom Tedesco possesses some supernatural talents as an engineer. Singer Julie Lyon exhibits a large element of the happy-go-lucky in her swinging recitations, perhaps most vividly shown in her take on Dindi, about the snappiest version I’ve heard yet in a song that’s been undergoing quite a renaissance in revisitations recently. Then there are the laid back, casual, way hip quotations from the quartet backing her, sounding as though just returned from a break in the back alley where the subject of ‘discussion’ was muggles, Jack Daniels, and maybe a nip or two of Romilar.

I mean, everything here is so strongly reminiscent of one of those way cool Shag (Josh Agle) paintings that I practically hear the painter’s vivid mono- and multi-chromatics and urbane exotica in the CD. Then come all the off-the-cuff incidentals the band adds in—catch especially Matt Levelle’s throaty bass clarinet fog in Every Time We Say Goodbye, so husky it’s almost aromatic—alongside Lyon’s friendly counter-culture intonations, a college girl matriculating in Hip 101. Bobby Brennan has the band nailed in with his solid bass work, and Tom Cabrera’s drumming evokes mental images of Maynard G. Krebs standing by, fingers snapping, grin wreathing Fu Manchu’ed face, while Jack DeSalvo’s guitar is a mercurial presence, dashing in for a doo-wop quotation, then sliding back out again.

Levelle, though is oft striking, as present and in the pocket as Lyon, he blazing (as in the trumpet work in Too Damn Hot) while she smile-sings seductively, caught between wanting to gambol in the sun, grab that martini on the sidebar, and/or wink at the guy who just strolled in, tan, lean, and mysterious. All or Nothing at All undergoes a modern art treatment, pointillistic and fragmentary, Lyon holding everything together while the guys get jagged and rambly. Then she clarifies and espanola-izes Tom Waits bizarre Temptation, turning it from a near-inchoate schizophrenic blues into something the Asylum Street Spankers would’ve produced. And if I pen any more paeans here, I’m going to have to check into Keroauc Rehab and have my typewriter re-tuned, so why not just glom the CD and just dig what’s goin’ down, gator.”

Edited by: David N. Pyles


By: Jonathan Shade, nitelifeexchange.com

“Have you ever had one of those moments where the stars align and everything seems to just be “right” with the world? Well, The Julie Lyon Quintet’s album, Julie, is the musical equivalent of this phenomenon, except the “stars” happen to be musicians. Julie Lyon has struck gold by assembling a top notch group of four instrumentalists for her debut Quintet recording, and we should be thanking those stars for it. The five wunderkinds in this group are Ms. Lyon herself on vocals, Tom Cabrera (drums and percussion), Matt Lavelle (trumpet and alto clarinet), Jack DeSalvo (guitars and mandola), and Bobby Brennan (double bass).

She has also chosen some great material to cover on her new album which ranges from old standards (Love For Sale, Blackbird), to newer and more unfamiliar works (Dindi, Too Damn hot – not to be confused with Porter’s Too Darn Hot). No matter what the song being played, the whole album has an absolute authenticity and upon first listen, I felt like I was (or at least wanted to be) in an underground smoke filled jazz club at two am, sucking in the energy that the quintet is giving out.

Each musician lends his superb talents to this recording, playing some really nice solos here, notably Jack DeSalvo’s guitar and Tom Cabrera’s drums on “Comes Love” as well as Matt Lavelle’s dexterously played trumpet and Bobby Brennan’s bouncy double bass on “Too Damn Hot”. After the gentlemen’s wonderful solo playing, Ms. Lyon’s steadfast and more than able voice always comes in again to bring together the whole effort, elevating each song leaving the listener in a type of “Jazz Nirvana”

Ms. Lyon shows that the she knows exactly what she is doing here and executes all of her songs exquisitely. She’s the real deal in her element here with a voice that is like a nice chianti – Smooth, subtle, complex, and a little playful. When she is singing, what you hear is not only the lyrics, but a visceral love of singing that shines through her instrument, very refreshing and appealing.

Standouts on this album include a rapturously sleepy “Everytime We Say Goodbye” featuring a great guitar solo, a really nice slow build of instruments on “All Or Nothing At All” that starts with ominous sounding drums, with the bass being added, followed by the guitar, and ending with the horns, all cooperating to create a great track here where everybody works great off each other and shines together, Ms. Lyon’s sultry and velvet vocals on “Comes Love” and a version of “Blackbird” unlike any other that I’ve heard that I thoroughly enjoyed.

From instruments to vocals, the listener is taken on a ride from one delight to the next on this great sounding album. Ending with Tom Wait’s “Tempation”, which is a delightful version of a great song, Ms. Lyon’s final words on this album are “I can’t resist”. My feelings exactly.”


By: Chris Spector, midwestrecord.com

“It’s interesting to see that the new generation of jazz divas can draw water from the same well but still manage to spike the drink with a special sauce of their own that gives them some distinctive real estate to plant a flag on. Certainly a classic feeling thrush, Lyon is sassy and saucy seemingly taking Birdland to the tea pad after hours with the jam going in full force. Same church, different pew—this one’s filled with the bad kids hanging out in the back. Fun stuff.”


By: Leonid Auskern, jazzquad.ru

“At the time of this writing, from the author‘s window, the is view is of wet snow mixed with rain. In such nasty weather the debut album of the Julie Lyon Quintet is the best cure for the blues. Anyway, I would warm it up with mugs of anything hot or glasses with anything firewater. Julie will give you almost an hour of warm, sincere and very cozy jazz. This American vocalist and her partners do not seek to create some bold experiments, avant-garde delights or to display the power of the voice. The voice of Julie Lyon is not about free rein sound but rather depth of experience and the aura of the truth of jazz will not leave you from the first track to the last.

The program of the Julie album is songs from different times and different atmospheres. There are classic jazz standards, such as Bye Bye Blackbird or two evergreens, Cole Porter‘s Love For Sale and Every Time We Say Goodbye, a charming example of Brazilian jazz – Dindi by Jobim, and next – Strollin ‘ by Horace Silver, Too Damn Hot by Dr. Lonnie Smith with lyrics by Julie Lyon and the finale, Tom Wait’s Temptation. For each song, starting only from the text (without using, for example, scat) , Julie Lyon is able to create her own, special atmosphere. Personally, I feel especially close to the fun, even playful mood prevailing in Dindi, the pulsating swing of Too Damn Hot and the brilliant interpretation of Temptation.

All the tracks are arranged so that you can really listen to the quintet and not just a singer with an accompanying ensemble. Virtually every one of instrumentalists has ample opportunity to demonstrate their skills. I emphasize here Matt Lavelle’s solo trumpet in Bye Bye Blackbird and Temptation, his alto clarinet in Dindi, the artful guitar of Jack DeSalvo in Comes Love and his duet with bassist Bobby Brennan in Born To Be Blue, as well as Tom Cabrera’s opening drum solo in All Or Nothing At All.

According to the press release, the album Julie will go on sale in January 2015, although the cover indicates it was recorded in Paramus, New Jersey in 2013. I do not know what caused such a substantial gap between the two dates, but this is the case when you want to say, better late than never.”


By: Czékus Mihály, streamaudio.hu
“For those who like hip, catchy melodies, there’s a lot of unforgettable moments in store on New York jazz singer Julie Lyon’s new album, which is Julie’s latest release, but not her only one.

The singer’s fans had to wait a long time for this disc, as Lyon’s previous album, Live Between Now And Then appeared in 2007. But now experiencing the fresh material, we can say that the wait was well worth it, because the repertoire is better and more interesting compositions can be found here. You can hear a great example of swing on Dr. Lonnie Smith’s “Too Damn Hot” with lyrics by Julie Lyon.  Just like the aforementioned song, There are meaningful thrills with “Every Time We Say Goodbye” as well as with Tom Wait’s “Temptation” with its “Parisian cafe” flavor.

Thanks to the great singer’s voice and the excellent team of studied musicians you can almost feel the hot, swinging atmosphere of a real jazz club.”


By: Jeff Simon, buffalonews.com

“Julie Lyon Quintet, “Julie” (Unseen Rain). Julie Lyon is a jazz singer originally from Orlando who now lives in New York. Why do so few jazz discs ever give you this basic information, you know? I am tired of having to Google and find out. She is joined by a small combo here for 10 standards. I like how she includes “Dindi,” with its meandering, female lyrics (“I don’t know, I don’t know …”). Lyon also does a cute job with “Comes Love.” And there’s a Tom Waits song, “Temptation.” It doesn’t work out too well – the accompaniment, in particular, runs off the rails – but it’s always nice to have a Tom Waits song anyway. The real reason this disc caught my attention, though, was that “Too Damn Hot” is not the standard by Cole Porter – that’s “Too Darn Hot,” come to think of it – but a blues by Lackawanna native Dr. Lonnie Smith. Lyon liked it enough to put words to it. “What else can I do to cool this heat? Cupid’s arrows have been shot/Like the noonday sun, your kisses/Are just too damn hot.”


By: Bruce Crowther, jazzmostly.com

“This is another debut album, this time bringing to wide attention singer Julie Lyon who leads her New York Quartet through a selection of songs, mostly familiar, that display her rhythmic ease and intelligent interpretations. Among the songs performed here are Love For Sale, Dr Lonnie Smith’s Too Damn Hot, for which Julie has provided lyrics, Bye Bye BlackbirdStrollin’Dindi anComes Love. Julie is ably backed by her quartet: Matt Lavelle, trumpet, Jack DeSalvo, guitar, Bobby Brennan, bass, and Tom Cabrera, drums.
 The songs are performed in a manner that melds contemporary expectations with the older traditions from which jazz came. Julie’s accompanists provide a suitable backdrop for her and there are some well-taken solo moments from Matt Lavelle both on trumpet and on a breathily played alto clarinet. Most notable among the instrumental soloists is Jack DeSalvo who plays guitar and mandola with inventive flair. The set is rhythmically underpinned by Brennan and Cabrera, the latter providing many ear-catching moments, such as his imaginative introduction to 
All Or Nothing At All.”


By: George W. Harris, jazzweekly.com

“Vocalist Julie Lyon has a voice that recalls Blossom Dearie, and also benefits from an air tight band, similar in makeup with Tom Cabrera/dr, Jack DeSalvo/g and Bobby Brennan/b but with the added attraction of trumpeter/clarinetist Mat LaVelle, who adds some nice horn sounds on the cheerful “Strollin’” and alto clarinet on the glistening “Dindi.” The band has a gentle stride going one step at a time on “Every Time We Say Goodbye” and while her voice sounds a bit distant on “Bye Bye Blackbird” and during the loosey goosey “Born to Be Blue,” the symbiosis of the band carries her over the River Jordan into the Promised Land.”


 

By: D. Oscar Groomes, osplacejazz.com

“Singer Julie Lyon tees up ten classic jazz and pop songs. “Dindi”, “Too Damn Hot” and “Comes Love” are a few. She has the luxury of a decent band alongside her with drummer Tom Cabrera, guitarist Jack DeSalvo, Matt Lavelle playing trumpet and clarinet and bassist Bobby Brennan. Together the quintet is palatable.”


By: Jack Goodstein, blogcritics.org

“Vocalist Julie Lyon debuted her Julie Lyon Quintet in late 2013 with Juliebut Unseen Rain put it out again this past January. It is a swinging 10-tune collection culled mostly from the standard repertoire – songs like“Love for Sale,” “Bye Bye Blackbird,” “All or Nothing at All,” and “Comes Love.” Tom Cabrera (her husband) is on drums and Bobby Brennan on double bass. Trumpeter and alto clarinetist Matt Lavelle and guitarist Jack DeSalvo complete the ensemble.”


By: Vittorio Lo Conte, musiczoom.it

“The debut of Julie Lyon could not be better, the disc is managed and the standards that are projected are shown with her beautiful voice. She submits you to a treat. Julie is an original nonconformist with the band and so leads them to a point where the jazz of the past must agree with the present. The atmosphere of night clubs are in full swing, but also outside the conventions of the genre. Guitarist Jack DeSalvo stands out for his angular harmonies played with his instrument, a fine example is the end of Born to be Blue. Bobby Brennan is on bass and drums are all Tom Cabrera. To accompany the voice of Julie is Matt Lavelle on trumpet, but on Dindi, one of the standards most performed of late, is the clarinet with a high squeaky sound that confirms the originality. Here the bossa nova acquires a special dimension, far from the interpretations of the mold easy listening. The general impression is that Lyon has found the perfect band with the musical material to perform, and this of course is also in the best interest of the listeners. The famous Love for Sale by Cole Porter, dating back to 1930, is in the form, modern and with a precious intervention on guitar, as well as Bye Bye Blackbird by Ray Henderson, the drafting of which dates back to 1926. There is a great version of Every Time We Say Goodbye, another song written by Cole Porter. There are also more modern compositions, as the final Temptation by Tom Waits, again a completely different version from the original, introduced by a mandolin of Jack DeSalvo and the percussion of Tom Cabrera. Brilliant, to put on a par with what the great Waits has given us: even without a hoarse voice is a great song. Julie Lyon could not put out a better debut, the band and the songs choices put together creates an album that’s not easily forgotten.”


By: Leonid Auskern, jazzquad.ru

“At the time of this writing, from the author‘s windowthe view is of wet snow mixed withrain. In such nasty weather the debut albumof the Julie Lyon Quintet is the best cure for the bluesAnyway, I would warm it up with mugs of anything hot or glasses with anything firewaterJulie will give you almost an hour of warm, sincere and very cozy jazz.This American vocalist and her partners do not seek to create some bold experimentsavant-garde delights or to display the powerof the voice. The voice of Julie Lyon is notabout free rein sound but rather depth of experience and the aura of the truth of jazzwill not leave you from the first track to the last.

The program of the Julie album is songs from different times and different atmospheresThere are classic jazz standards, such as Bye Bye Blackbird or twoevergreensCole Porter‘s Love For Sale and Every Time We Say Goodbye, a charmingexample of Brazilian jazz – Dindi by Jobim, and next – Strollin ‘ by Horace Silver, Too Damn Hot by Dr. Lonnie Smith with lyrics by Julie Lyon and the finale, Tom Wait’s TemptationFor each song, starting only from the text (without using, for example, scat) , Julie Lyon is able to create her own, special atmospherePersonally, I feel especially close to the funeven playful mood prevailing in Dindi, the pulsating swing of Too Damn Hot and the brilliant interpretation of Temptation.

All the tracks are arranged so that you can really listen to the quintet and not just a singer with an accompanying ensemble. Virtually every one of instrumentalists hasample opportunity to demonstrate their skills. I emphasize here Matt Lavelle’s solotrumpet in Bye Bye Blackbird and Temptation, his alto clarinet in Dindi, the artful guitar of Jack DeSalvo on Comes Love and his duet with bassist Bobby Brennan in Born To Be Blue,as well as Tom Cabrera’s opening drum solo in All Or Nothing At All.

According to the press release, the album Julie will go on sale in January 2015, althoughthe cover indicates it was recorded in Paramus, New Jersey in 2013. I do not know what caused such a substantial gap between the two dates, but this is the case when you want to say, better late than never.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

JULIE LYON ARTIST PAGE

Julie_TTsJulie Lyon grew up with many and varied musical influences but from a very young age knew that she wanted to be a singer. She studied piano and voice from age 15 through college, earning a bachelor’s degree in vocal performance.  Classically trained and reared on pop, rock and blues, the draw of the vocal jazz greats, Sarah Vaughan, Nat King Cole, Ella Fitzgerald and many others, opened the door to a world in which Ms. Lyon is now at the top of her game. Initially fronting the premier jazz quartet in Orlando, Florida, Ms. Lyon and her drummer/husband/partner Tom Cabrera pulled up stakes, settled in the New York metropolitan area and assembled a quintet of remarkable musicians for their Unseen Rain Records release.UR9957_Julie_Front_for_CDBaby.1

On “Julie”, whether it’s the robust swing of Dr. Lonnie Smith’s “Too Damn Hot” (lyrics by Julie Lyon), the deeply felt “Every Time We Say Goodbye” or the Parisian cafe as speakeasy atmosphere of Tom Wait’s “Temptation”, Julie’s voice is glorious and the band is in full flight.

Ms. Lyon’s composing, arranging, improvising and lyric writing emerge from her seemingly disparate influences. Her quartet/quintet is performing at jazz clubs, festivals and everywhere single malt scotch is available. Current and future projects include a duo release with pianist Bob Rodriguez and more recordings with her own ensemble.

JULIE – JULIE LYON QUINTET (UR9957)
 High Definition FLAC Download – $10.99

JULIE LYON QUARTET EPK HERE

Please visit Julie’s site HERE

UR9957 – JULIE – JULIE LYON QUINTET

julie lyonUR9957_Julie_Lyon_Quintet_Julie_Front11

A voice simultaneously gifted with elegance, swing and more than a hint of blues roots, JULIE LYON debuts her New York Quintet on UNSEEN RAIN with her new album JULIE. Long time collaborator, UR artist and drummer TOM CABRERA joins trumpeter and alto clarinetist MATT LAVELLE, guitarist JACK DeSALVO and double-bassist BOBBY BRENNAN on this magnificent recording.

Listen HERE Purchase Downloads HERE CD available very soon

 

JazzWeekly Reviews JULIE

Vocalist Julie Lyon has a voice that recalls Blossom Dearie, and also benefits from an air tight band, similar in makeup with Tom Cabrera/dr, Jack DeSalvo/g and Bobby Brennan/b but with the added attraction of trumpeter/clarinetist Matt LaVelle, who adds some nice horn sounds on the cheerful “Strollin’” and alto clarinet on the glistening “Dindi.” The band has a gentle stride going one step at a time on “Every Time We Say Goodbye” and while her voice sounds a bit distant on “Bye Bye Blackbird” and during the loosey goosey “Born to Be Blue,” the symbiosis of the band carries her over the River Jordan into the Promised Land.

http://www.jazzweekly.com/2015/02/canaries-ellen-lafurn-cest-la-furn-julie-lyon-quintet-julie/

JULIE CD Available HERE

Review of JULIE on Hungary’s gondola.hu

by Mihály Czékus
For those who like hip, catchy melodies, there’s a lot of UR9957.JLQnt_back_c1unforgettable moments in store on New York jazz singer Julie Lyon’s new album, which is Julie’s latest release, but not her only one.

The singer’s fans had to wait a long time for this disc, as Lyon’s previous album, Live Between Now And Then appeared in 2007. But now experiencing the fresh material, we can say that the wait was well worth it, because the repertoire is better and more interesting compositions can be found here. You can hear a great example of swing on Dr. Lonnie Smith’s “Too Damn Hot” with lyrics by Julie Lyon.  Just like the aforementioned song, there are meaningful thrills with “Every Time We Say Goodbye” as well as with Tom Wait’s “Temptation” with its “Parisian cafe” flavor.

Thanks to the great singer’s voice and the excellent team of studied musicians you can almost feel the hot, swinging atmosphere of a real jazz club.

Get CD HERE

Get Hi-Def FLAC, CD quality FLAC, and mp3 (VBR maximum quality) Downloads HERE

Website: www.julielyonquartet.com

 

“…melds contemporary expectations with the older traditions” – Jazz Mostly Review of JULIE

JULIE LYON QUINTET – JULIE (Unseen Rain UR9957)

By Bruce Crowther http://jazzmostly.com/jazz-cd-reviews-early-january-2015

This is another debut album, this time bringing to wide attention Julie_Vocal_Booth23singer Julie Lyon who leads her New York Quartet through a selection of songs, mostly familiar, that display her rhythmic ease and intelligent interpretations. Among the songs performed here are Love For Sale, Dr Lonnie Smith’s Too Damn Hot, for which Julie has provided lyrics, Bye Bye BlackbirdStrollin’Dindi anComes Love. Julie is ably backed by her quartet: Matt Lavelle, trumpet, Jack DeSalvo, guitar, Bobby Brennan, bass, and Tom Cabrera, drums. The songs are performed in a manner that melds contemporary expectations with the older traditions from which jazz came. Julie’s accompanists provide a suitable backdrop for her and there are some well-taken solo moments from Matt Lavelle both on trumpet and on a breathily played alto clarinet. Most notable among the instrumental soloists is Jack DeSalvo who plays guitar and mandola with inventive flair. The set is rhythmically underpinned by Brennan and Cabrera, the latter providing many ear-catching moments, such as his imaginative introduction to All Or Nothing At All.

Purchase CD HERE

Download Album HERE

Mark Turner’s Brilliant Review of JULIE

JULIE – Julie Lyon Quintet (UR9957)UR9957.JLQnt_back_c1

By Mark S. Turner

Perhaps the most interesting element in this recording is the ‘live in studio’ nature lending a great deal of atmosphere and beatnik cafe society vibe to the affair. Well, actually, I’m assuming it was thus live ’cause it sure as hell sounds it—if not, if there are overdubs and such, then Tom Tedesco possesses some supernatural talents as an engineer. Singer Julie Lyon exhibits a large element of the happy-go-lucky in her swinging recitations, perhaps most vividly shown in her take on Dindi, about the snappiest version I’ve heard yet in a song that’s been undergoing quite a renaissance in revisitations recently. Then there are the laid back, casual, way hip quotations from the quartet backing her, sounding as though just returned from a break in the back alley where the subject of ‘discussion’ was muggles, Jack Daniels, and maybe a nip or two of Romilar.

I mean, everything here is so strongly reminiscent of one of those way cool Shag (Josh Agle) paintings that I practically hear the painter’s vivid mono- and multi-chromatics and urbane exotica in the CD. Then come all the off-the-cuff incidentals the band adds in—catch especially Matt Lavelle’s throaty bass clarinet fog in Every Time We Say Goodbye, so husky it’s almost aromatic—alongside Lyon’s friendly counter-culture intonations, a college girl matriculating in Hip 101. Bobby Brennan has the band nailed in with his solid bass work, and Tom Cabrera’s drumming evokes mental images of Maynard G. Krebs standing by, fingers snapping, grin wreathing Fu Manchu’ed face, while Jack DeSalvo’s guitar is a mercurial presence, dashing in for a doo-wop quotation, then sliding back out again.

Lavelle, though is oft striking, as present and in the pocket as Lyon, he blazing (as in the trumpet work in Too Damn Hot) while she smile-sings seductively, caught between wanting to gambol in the sun, grab that martini on the sidebar, and/or wink at the guy who just strolled in, tan, lean, and mysterious. All or Nothing at All undergoes a modern art treatment, pointillistic and fragmentary, Lyon holding everything together while the guys get jagged and rambly. Then she clarifies and espanola-izes Tom Waits bizarre Temptation, turning it from a near-inchoate schizophrenic blues into something the Asylum Street Spankers would’ve produced. And if I pen any more paeans here, I’m going to have to check into Keroauc Rehab and have my typewriter re-tuned, so why not just glom the CD and just dig what’s goin’ down, gator.

Edited by: David N. Pyles (dnpyles@acousticmusic.com)

“The Best Cure For The Blues”: A Review of Julie from Russia

UR9957.JLQnt_back_c1At the time of this writing, from the author‘s window, the view is of wet snow mixed with rain. In such nasty weather the debut album of the Julie Lyon Quintet is the best cure for the blues. Anyway, I would warm it up with mugs of anything hot or glasses with anything firewater. Julie will give you almost an hour of warm, sincere and very cozy jazz. This American vocalist and her partners do not seek to create some bold experiments, avant-garde delights or to display the power of the voice. The voice of Julie Lyon is not about free rein sound but rather depth of experience and the aura of the truth of jazz will not leave you from the first track to the last.

The program of the Julie album is songs from different times and different atmospheres. There are classic jazz standards, such as Bye Bye Blackbird or two evergreens, Cole Porter‘s Love For Sale and Every Time We Say Goodbye, a charming example of Brazilian jazz Dindi by Jobim, and next Strollin by Horace Silver, Too Damn Hot by Dr. Lonnie Smith with lyrics by Julie Lyon and the finale, Tom Wait’s Temptation. For each song, starting only from the text (without using, for example, scat) , Julie Lyon is able to create her own, special atmosphere. Personally, I feel especially close to the fun, even playful mood prevailing in Dindi, the pulsating swing of Too Damn Hot and the brilliant interpretation of Temptation.

All the tracks are arranged so that you can really listen to the quintet and not just a singer with an accompanying ensemble. Virtually every one of instrumentalists has ample opportunity to demonstrate their skills. I emphasize here Matt Lavelle’s solo trumpet in Bye Bye Blackbird and Temptation, his alto clarinet in Dindi, the artful guitar of Jack DeSalvo in Comes Love and his duet with bassist Bobby Brennan in Born To Be Blue, as well as Tom Cabrera’s opening drum solo in All Or Nothing At All.

According to the press release, the album Julie will go on sale in January 2015, although the cover indicates it was recorded in Paramus, New Jersey in 2013. I do not know what caused such a substantial gap between the two dates, but this is the case when you want to say, better late than never.

– Leonid
Auskern, http://jazzquad.ru/index.pl?act=PRODUCT&id=3973

CD available HERE.

 

 

“Special Sauce” : Julie reviewed by Midwest Record

Screen Shot 2014-12-09 at 6.37.21 PM

UNSEEN RAIN JULIE LYON QUINTET/Julie: It’s interesting to see that the new generation of jazz divas can draw water from the same well but still manage to spike the drink with a special sauce of their own that gives them some distinctive real estate to plant a flag on. Certainly a classic feeling thrush, Lyon is sassy and saucy seemingly taking Birdland to the tea pad after hours with the jam going in full force. Same church, different pew—this one’s filled with the bad kids hanging out in the back. Fun stuff.
UR9957

CD Available HERE.

Unseen Rain Records and Woodshedd Records

Jack DeSalvo Live at Scholes Street

One Footprint – Jack DeSalvo, Larry Hutter, Tom Cabrera

 

 

  • Quintrepid

     

     

  •  

  • Rocco John Iacovone,  Jack DeSalvo, Mark Hagan,                            Phil Sirois, Tom Cabrera

 

  • Jack DeSalvo, Joel Shapira, Phil Sirois, Tom Cabrera

 

  • Jack DeSalvo, Dmitry Ishenko, Tom Cabrera

 

  • Rich Rosenthal, Phil Sirois, Tom Cabrera

 

Larry Hutter

 

Audio Engineer Larry Hutter may be viewed as a purist by some, but he’s a purist in a most modern sense. Currently a double-bassist in Orlando, his remarkable recordings are informed by years of hands on exposure to live music. In fact his initial recordings were often documentation of live performances on which he was the bass player. His first participation with Unseen Rain was mixing Julie Lyon’s classic quintet album Julie. The results are astounding, and now Larry dreamt of the right situation where he could realize his concept from beginning to end. 

“I strive to make recordings with a deep sense of space. I prefer jazz recordings that sound organic and live.  Whenever appropriate, I record the musicians in the same room without headphones or isolation, and use the fewest microphones possible.” – Larry Hutter

While continuing to mix and edit recordings for Unseen Rain he traveled to New York for a two mic recording of the quintet Zone for their eponymous first album and again a year later for their second, Zone II

In reference to the statement above a “purist in a most modern sense”, along with drummer and Unseen Rain artist Tom Cabrera, he has created a modus operandi where, still in Orlando, with a deep understanding of the sound of the room, he supervises the placement of mics, instruments, etc. at Woodshedd Studio in Long Island near New York city and mixes them at his studio in Orlando. Numerous recording have emerged from this process and has led to the Woodshedd Records label.  Larry is a partner in Meyefi, the organizations that contains both Unseen rain Records and Woodshedd Records.

Larry records in his own studio in Orlando where some of the musicians often travel from New York for sessions. Julie Lyon’s  Whisper of Dreams (on which he also plays double-bass) was the first release tracked there, though many have been mixed and mastered at Larry’s studio.

Larry’s discography as a recording, mixing, editing and engineer is constantly growing. Below are some examples of his work both on the Unseen Rain and Woodshedd Records labels ~

 

UNSEEN RAIN RECORDS

“Jim (DeSalvo) is the engineer, and Jim’s capture of everything is arresting: clear, lucid, adroitly attuned to shifting focal depths, never at a loss, providing everything this work needed to entablature itself with zero ambivalence.” – acousticmusic.com

THE MUSIC

JULIE LYON

SUMARI

SUMARI – Matt Lavell, Jack DeSalvo, Tom Cabrera

JACK DeSALVO

Jack DeSalvo

ROCCO JOHN IACOVONE

Rocco John Iacovone

JOEL SHAPIRA

Joel Shapiro

MATT LAVELLE

Matt Lavelle

RICH ROSENTHAL

Rich Rosenthal

 FULMINATE TRIO

Fulminate Trio

BLAISE SIWULA

Blaise Siwula

PAT HALL

Pat Hall

 

TOM CABRERA

Tom Cabrera

RICH ROSENTHAL

Rich Rosenthal

 

LEWIS PORTER

LEWIS PORTER

CHRIS KELSEY

CHRIS KELSEY

 

UR BOOTLEG SERIES

UNSEEN RAIN BOOTLEG SERIES

ZONE

ZONE – ROCCO JOHN IACOVONE, JACK DeSALVO, CHRIS FORBES, DMITRY ISHENKO, TOM CABRERA

 

WOODSHEDD RECORDS

WOODSHEDD RECORDS

KOTKA

KOTKA – Guillermo Bazzola, Risto Vuolanna, Fernando Lamas

 

 

RMO

RMO – Bob Rodriguez, Lee Marvin, Kresten Osgood

 DOM MINASI

 

QUINTESSENTIAL UNSEEN RAIN RECORDINGS

Quintessential Unseen Rain Recordings

HILLIARD GREENE

Hilliard Greene

 

THE SOUND

JIM DeSALVO

LARRY HUTTER

WOODSHEDD RECORDS

Contrassio Trio perform JACK DeSALVO’s PRAMANTHA in Palencia, Spain

https://youtu.be/lxWfniV657I

Contrassio Trio perform Jack DeSalvo’s piece Pramantha in Palencia, Spain.

Pramantha has also been performed by classical guitarist ADAM KAHN in the UK.

Pramantha has been recorded by a number of artists, including:

JULIE LYON on the album MOONFLOWER,
ARTHUR LIPNER on IN ANY LANGUAGE
JACK DeSALVO on PRAMANTHA
and the soon-to-be released WHILE WE SLEEP by JACK DeSALVO and TOM CABRERA

Jack DeSalvo Bio

JACK DeSALVO, hailed in THE WIRE magazine as “masterful”, built his international reputation as a member of D3, Ronald Shannon Jackson’s Decoding Society and in duo with vibist Arthur Lipner.  DeSalvo plays all manner of guitars and is a highly regarded composer as well as performing on cello, various members of the mandolin family and banjo, “…banjo player Jack DeSalvo uncorks a salvo of twangs as if Earl Scruggs has pushed his way into a Count Basie jam.” – Ken Waxman, NYC Jazz Record. DeSalvo performs solo, in a number of duos and with his own trio and quartet. He is a member of the Julie Lyon Quintet, Matt Lavelle’s 12 Houses, Sumari and a number of other NYC-based ensembles.  Jack DeSalvo currently records for UNSEEN RAIN Records, appearing on more than 20 releases. He has also recorded for other labels, including German labels Enja and Belafon.  After studying classical guitar with Leonid Bolotine, composition with Ariadna Mikéshina and jazz guitar with Al Faraldi he attended the Berklee College of Music, studied The Lydian Chromatic Concept with George Russell and pursued further guitar studies with Bill Connors.

Extended Bio HERE

 

“…letting the music go where it must. ” Doug Simpson Reviews ROCCO JOHN QT’s EMBRACE THE CHANGE

unnamedRocco John Quartet – Embrace the Change – Unseen Rain  by Audiophile Audition/ July 11, 2016/ Jazz CD Reviews

New York City quartet which promotes changes, all sorts of changes.

Rocco John Quartet – Embrace the Change [TrackList follows] – Unseen Rain UR-9947, 67:49 [5/6/16] ****:

(Rocco John Iacovone – alto and soprano saxophone; Rich Rosenthal – guitar; François Grillot – double bass; Tom Cabrera – drums)

Alto and soprano saxophonist Rocco John Iacovone and his quartet make accessible avant-garde and free jazz; or rather the musicians produce free-ranging material that is challenging but which is not too demanding to enjoy. There is an engaging openness to the eight lengthy tracks on this 68-minute release, Embrace the Change. There’s a continual development throughout Iacovone’s originals, a sense that listeners might not know where they’re going to next, but will appreciate the shifts and curves along the way. Rocco John (he shortens his name for his album projects) explains the underlying concept for his latest recording, “Embrace the change is a thought, an idea, and a philosophy. It’s a comment on our evolution as human beings. It seems the only constant we experience is change and we constantly need to learn how to deal with it. To do this, we have to dig deep. These were the thoughts behind the compositions as I wrote them, and as we went into the studio.”

Rocco John studied with Lee Konitz and Sam Rivers, and learned composition from Nadia Boulanger; that education and his many years as an active member of the NYC jazz community has honed his abilities as performer and writer; and as collaborator and leader. All of Rocco John’s skills and talent fuse on this creative outpouring, where he is joined by other New York artists: guitarist Rich Rosenthal (who operates his own ensemble and has credits which include Mark Dresser, Joe McPhee and Dom Minasi); double bassist François Grillot (who also runs his own band and has worked with Jason Hwang, Daniel Levin and others) and drummer Tom Cabrera (who co-founded the Julie Lyon Quartet with his wife; and has recorded with other Unseen Rain label mates).

The foursome commences with the free-bop “Wings,” a 7:18 piece which defies easy expectations. The mutable harmonics, for example, mirror those often associated with Ornette Coleman (principally his 1970s or 1980s LPs), while Rocco John’s sometimes bleating horn honors John Coltrane. While it would have been simple to go overboard, the quartet maintains a defiant, but in no way overzealous, confidence in letting the music go where it must. The eight-minute “Circuits” envelops the notion that all people are connected, no matter a person’s racial background, religious history or political orientation. “Circuits” has a pronounced pace and nuanced progression, highlighted by Rosenthal and Iacovone’s twinned sax and guitar; Cabrera’s subtle brushes on cymbals; and Grillot’s bass lines. During this track, Grillot deftly brings to mind Dave Holland, due to Grillot’s superlatively understated rhythmic changes. The proceedings get more restless and edgy on “Escape,” where the quartet employs a tumbling tempo and head to liberating territory with intense but never extreme solos. Rocco John clarifies the tune is about the “need to escape the traps and think independently and creatively.”

Spirituality and belief is the focus of “Dial Up.” Iacovone discloses the eight-minute number “represents calling for assistance from the universe.” While the title implies an older conveyance of communication, “Dial Up” is modern creative music with an ear to the present, past and future all at once. Rosenthal’s lighter tone settles his guitar back a bit in the mix, while Rocco John’s sax is upfront and spotlighted throughout. Cabrera and Grillot sustain an advanced rhythmic approach which furnishes an off-kilter mannerism which befits this ever-moving composition. Another tune which links individuals to the cosmos is the longest piece, called “72s,” which Iacovone simply states, is a “connection to the Endless.” This track affords plenty of space and room for crisscrossed musical patterns which blend free jazz, post-bop, open improvisation and more, fashioning the album’s most comprehensive and multifaceted tune. One notable spot is a middle section where Rosenthal takes a fluid solo accentuated by Grillot’s beautiful arco bass. The Rocco John Quartet conclude as they begin, with an alternate rendering of the opening track, the 7:51 “Wings (Epilogue).” While this version is different from the first one, it shares the same attitude of nonconformity and inventiveness. Embrace the Change may be a smidge discordant or jarring at times, but it’s not harsh or rasping, and everything about the band’s methodology contributes to the perception that this is music that is intentionally open-minded and celebratory, but determinedly not strident or piercing.

TrackList: Wings; Escape; Circuits; Dial Up; Tango; Whispers; 72s; Wings (Epilogue).

—Doug Simpson

Save

Save

Save

From Russia: Great Review of ROCCO JOHN’s EMBRACE THE CHANGE.

roccojMedia Alert: Rocco John Quartet “Embrace The Change”
(Unseen Rain UR-9947)
ROCCO JOHN IACOVONE alto and soprano saxophones, RICH ROSENTHAL guitar, FRANÇOIS GRILLOT double-bass, TOM CABRERA drums

CD Review: http://jazzquad.ru/index.pl?act=PRODUCT&id=4418

By Leonid Auskern

Alto saxophonist Rocco John Iacovone had excellent teachers, these mentors, however, came from very different places on the musical map. On one hand Rocco played in the brilliant free jazz master Sam Rivers’ Orchestral Explorations, and, on the other he studied with the master of cool-jazz Lee Konitz. His own playing style was formed under the influence of both of these artists. If you find it hard to UR9947 Embrace The change MINIimagine such a combination, listen to Embrace The Change, the most recent album of the quartet of Rocco John. He founded his first band in 1997 (then it was the trio), and today Rocco John Iacovone is a prominent figure among the avant-garde scene of New York, founder and art director of the Coalition of Creative Artists.

Embrace The Change has Rocco playing with Rich Rosenthal, an accomplished guitar player who overcame some early vicissitudes, a New York Frenchman, bassist François Grillot and drummer Tom Cabrera, who is the only one of the four of whom I had heard earlier on his wife Julie Lyon’s album Julie, also published by Unseen Rain Records. All the tracks of Embrace The Change were written by Rocco John, and this is not a random collection of disparate pieces but rather a conceptual suite dedicated to a deeply philosophical theme, the evolution of human existence.

Following the ancient Greek sage Heraclitus, who argued that in the same river one can not enter twice, Rocco John defends the idea that the only constant in the evolution of man is eternal movement, eternal change, and to which man can only adapt. By means of music, of course, may seem too abstract a tool for solving this problem, but in the avant-garde, mostly free-form jazz of Rocco John, indisputably genuine feeling is present, not to mention the purely aesthetic pleasure from listening to the playing of this quartet of musicians. I especially would like to mention such compositions as Circuits (the relationship of people living with each other – Rocco provides all the explanations of the songs in the liner notes to this work), Tango, which he described as the dance of life and a very unusual song 72’s (“Communication with infinity” says Rocco John), where the second part suddenly starts to sound background of the famous Jewish song “Eveynu Shalom Aleichem”, which in Hebrew means “We wish you peace”. It is probably not by chance that this wish of peace was included by Rocco John in his suite.

10.99 – High Definition 24/96 FLAC

9.99 – CD Quality FLAC

8.99 – MP3

Great SUMARI Review from Croatia

Research into sound is a basic characteristic of the creative trio Sumari. Opportunities for such research are large, and this is for three reasons: curiosity, commitment and creativity of musicians who explore the great opportunities of the mutual combination of instruments. As well as having vast experience of playing in various styles and idioms, all three of them are multi-instrumentalists. Matt Lavelle plays the trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn, pocket trumpet and alto clarinet, Jack DeSalvo, who is the producer of the album, playing the cello, guitar and mandola, and Tom Cabrera plays bodhrán, tar, riq, doumbek, bass drum and percussion. As their unusual setup the unconventional way they approach the improvisations is adopted from playing with respectable experimenters. Among others Lavelle has collaborated with saxophonist Ornette Coleman, DeSalvo with drummer Ronald Shannon Jackson and Cabrera with singer Julie Lyon. It is a spontaneous collective communication that brings unpredictable results with seven performances making up the whole. They were built without premeditation, and the titles of the tracks were likely added subsequently. The names of these compositions reveal the intention of the musicians, a source of inspiration and philosophical outlook on life and music. Just looking at these titles of the songs creates the illusion that we can penetrate deeper into the personality and preoccupations of these musicians and figure out why and how they create. It inspires the creativity of the listener. Before hearing them, how would you imagine songs bearing the following titles: “Seth Dance”, “Counterparts Are Comparitively Encountered”, “Scientific Cults and Private Paranoias”, “Reincarnational Civilizations”, “Alternate Presents and Multiple Focus”, ” The Gates of Horn “and” The Nature of Mass Events “?

 Davor Hrvoj, soundguardian.com   http://www.soundguardian.com/index.php?option=com_muscol&view=album&id=3250

Matt Lavelle (trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn, pocket trumpet, alto clarinet Jack DeSalvo (mandola, cello, guitars) Tom Cabrera (bodhrán, tar, riq, doumbek, bass drum, percussion)
Matt Lavelle (trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn, pocket trumpet, alto clarinet
Jack DeSalvo (mandola, cello, guitars)
Tom Cabrera (bodhrán, tar, riq, doumbek, bass drum, percussion)

GET CD HERE

High Definition Apple Lossless Download $10.99

High Definition FLAC Download $10.99

CD quality Apple Lossless Download $9.99

CD quality FLAC Download $9.99

mp3 320k (recommended for iTunes users) $8.99

Listen to Wings from Rocco John Quartet’s New Release EMBRACE THE CHANGE.

10.99 – High Definition 24/96 FLAC

9.99 – CD Quality FLAC

8.99 – MP3

EMBRACE THE CHANGE – ROCCO JOHN QUARTET

ROCCO JOHN IACOVONE alto and soprano saxophones
RICH ROSENTHAL guitar
FRANÇOIS GRILLOT double-bass
TOM CABRERA drums

According to saxophonist and composer Rocco John Iacovone, “EMBRACE THE CHANGE is a thought, an idea, and a philosophy.  It’s a comment on our evolution as human beings. It seems the only constant we experience is change and we constantly need to learn how to deal with it. To do this, we have to dig deep. These were the thoughts behind the compositions as I wrote them, and as we went into the studio.”

Rocco John Iacovone’s studies with the legendary Lee Konitz and Sam Rivers as well as studies in composition under the direct disciples of Nadia Boulanger gives him a wide swath of musicial influences that color each track of EMBRACE THE CHANGE. His stellar quartet gets deep into the leader’s music, designed to elicit unmitigated passion and creativity from Rich Rosenthal, François Grillot and Tom Cabrera.

Rocco describes each album track in the liner notes:

WINGS   7’21: A free bop piece to free up our thoughts.
CIRCUITS   8’08: However remote or even impossible it may seem, we are all connected.
ESCAPE   8’39: The traps are all set up, wherever we turn. We need to escape the traps and think
independently and creatively.
DIAL UP   8’00:  This represents calling for assistance from the universe.
TANGO   9’52: The dance of life.
WHISPERS   4’32: While we all hear the loud voices telling us what to do and how to do it, we
really need to quiet down and listen to the whispers of our inner self.
72’s   10’56: Connection to the Endless.
Wings (Epilogue)   7:51: The Joy of it all.

All music by Rocco John Iacovone

Recorded March, 2015 and mixed at Urban Sound Studios, Riverdale, NJ by Todd Urban
Mastered at Beanstudio, Wayne, NJ by Jim DeSalvo
Cover painting by Denise Iacovone
Design by Qua’s Eye Graphix

Produced by Jack DeSalvo

Rocco_Back

 

Rocco John Iacovone Biography

Composer/Saxophones/Piano Rocco John Iacovone studied privately with Lee Konitz. He holds a BA and Master’s degree in Composition from Hunter College where he studied classical music under the direct disciples of Nadia Boulanger. To round out his education, he went on to study and perform under the direction of Sam Rivers’ Orchestral Explorations at the Studio Rivbea in NYC. Rocco has been actively involved in composing, performing, and teaching ever since.

Presently, in addition to composing and performing events with his arts group, The Coalition of Creative Artists (COCA), Rocco John plays regularly in NYC with the Rocco John Group. Most recently he has been active playing in groups other than his own. Rocco also has a recurring summer Jazz residency in Alaska playing original and straight-ahead jazz with his group “Rare Form”.

Rocco cut his teeth playing first Alto in Sam Rivers’ “Orchestral Explorations” at the Studio Rivbea during the “loft” years. He’s played with Karl Berger, Barry Atschul, the Jazz Composers Orchestra, Larry Grenadier and Phil Grenadier. His years of study with Lee Konitz, and training under Sam Rivers helped Rocco create a compositional and playing style that often reflects Lee’s emphasis on tasteful restraint combined with Sam’s sense of adventurous abstraction. Given his musical training, and classical influences, it is no surprise that Rocco’s music blurs the lines between “in” and “out” playing; creating a link between the two for the audience to follow. Audience participation is important to Rocco’s philosophy of sharing the universal aspect of music. He encourages his audience to be active listeners, and sometimes runs shows, through COCA, that encourage audience participation in multiple disciplines in a very tangible way.

In addition to performing and recording, Rocco is dedicated to the idea of strengthening the Jazz idiom by passing the music on to the next generation. To that end Rocco has spent many years as a Teaching Artist, teaching Jazz, Improvisation and Jazz History. Rocco frequently gives Jazz residencies with his band and has been the recipient of three Chamber Music America Residency Grants. Rocco does Jazz residencies and workshops all around the world.

Rocco has a number of CD’s as leader. They feature The Rocco John Group. The first one, “Miles To Go”, is a free approach to a collection of original and standard tunes. The second CD, “Don’t wait too Long…”is comprised entirely of original tunes by Rocco. Their third CD, also all originals, is called Devotion, and it is a dedication album to some of Rocco’s Jazz favorites. Like the others, has garnered critical acclaim. There are also four CD’s with RARE FORM. RARE FORM is Rocco’s duo with Murray Nash (composition/keyboard/bass), his collaborator in Alaska. The CD’s: “Live at the Fairview”, “Please Seat Yourself” and “Conversation in 3”are freewheeling interpretations of standards and originals. The fourth CD, “Lose Yer Blues” features original music by both artists.

Rocco has additional collaborative CDs with other groups., and is working on original music for his Octet, The Improvisational Composers Ensemble. Rocco started ICE as a platform for composers whose work features improvisation as a compositional element. He has played his original suites with ICE at Arlene’s, Piano’s and The Stone, and continues to write for this ensemble.

Rocco can often be heard in NYC and has recently played at Nu-Blu, Pianos, Arlene’s, Clemente Soto velez, Freddie’s, ABC No Rio, Shape Shifter Lounge, The Downtown Music gallery, Culture fix, Zirzamin, Goodbye Blue Monday and others. He can be heard most summers with Rare Form, in Talkeetna Alaska. For his schedule, go to www.roccojohnmusic.com.

Rich Rosenthal Biography

Guitarist/composer Rich Rosenthal has weathered a life of hard work, hard study, and hard knocks, and on the way developed a jazz-derived avant-garde style that places a premium on originality, spontaneity, and the intense expression of straight-forward emotion. Rich’s goal is, above all, to communicate on a profound level. In that quest, he draws from not only the obvious inspirations – great free jazz artists like Ornette Coleman and Cecil Taylor – but also from straight-ahead jazz guitarists like Tal Farlow and Pat Martino, as well as classical composers like J.S. Bach and Hector Villa Lobos. His is a vastly personal music that he hopes will allow listeners to, as he says, “transcend the mundane … take them to another place.”

Rosenthal was born in the Bronx N.Y., on Oct.15th 1964. His father, a WW II veteran, owned a dental lab and worked as a dental technician in a V.A. hospital. His mother worked in a school cafeteria. Neither parent was musical, but his father was a jazz lover. Rich grew-up hearing the sounds of Paul Desmond, Dave Brubeck, Ahmad Jamal, and Errol Garner around the house. An older brother introduced Rosenthal to the music of Carlos Santana, which inspired him to begin playing music. Rich’s parents bought the twelve-year-old a twenty-five-dollar acoustic guitar. He took lessons from a distant cousin, jazz guitarist Dave Moreno. Besides teaching him the basics, Moreno lent him recordings by great blues, jazz, and rock guitarists.

Moreno also imparted his love of jazz’s cutting edge, taking the aspiring guitarist to New York City performances by such eminent free jazz musicians as Coleman, Steve Lacy, Jimmy Lyons, Sun Ra, among many others. Rich was befriended by two associates of Taylor, Glen Spearman and Raphe Malik, who encouraged him to pursue his music.

When it came time to attend high school, Rich wanted to attend NYC’s prestigious High School of Music and Art. His parents were dead set against a career in music, however, so instead Rich attended a business-oriented high school. The effect was devastating. Depression led to drug and alcohol addiction. Still, he kept playing. His parents moved to Wappingers Falls, NY, where Rosenthal attended Roy C. Ketcham High School. He joined the school’s jazz ensemble and took guitar lessons from Poughkeepsie guitarist Dave Woods. He also studied with jazz guitarist Eddie Diehl.

After high school, Rosenthal joined the Steamfitters Union and stopped taking music lessons, though he managed to play on his own, with friends and at local jam sessions. Substance-abuse problems persisted, however, and he eventually stopped playing altogether. In 1991, after years in the wilderness, Rosenthal got clean. Dave Moreno was by that time living in Manhattan. Rich resumed lessons with his mentor. He studied mostly classical guitar with Moreno for two years, before deciding once and for all to concentrate on his own jazz-based music. To that end he studied with the composer Edgar Grana, and began attending college classes, first at Mercy College, where he studied with, among others, Ornette Coleman’s guitarist, Kenny Wessel. At the same time, he worked as a pipe-fitter for the MTA and played standard jazz gigs around Westchester County.

After a year at Mercy, Rich transferred to the New School Jazz and Contemporary Music Music Program. It was a stressful period, balancing a full-time day gig with the school’s strict requirements, but studies with the likes of Andrew Cyrille, Richard Boukas, Bruce Arnold, Kurk Nurock and Bill Kirchner made it worthwhile. An especially important aspect was the opportunity to have the school’s ensembles play his original compositions.

Rosenthal began playing with saxophonist/composer Joe Giardullo, who became a major influence on his work. They played free and developed arrangements of compositions by Thelonious Monk, Paul Motian, and Anthony Braxton, to name a few. Giardullo also introduced him to George Russell’s Lydian Chromatic Concept, as well as the compositional techniques of Wadada Leo Smith, and Giardullo’s own Gravity Music concept.

The 2000s saw Rosenthal’s music career gain momentum. In 2005 he recorded the critically-acclaimed album Red Morocco with Giardullo for RogueArt Records. A year later, he graduated from the New School with a B.F.A. in Jazz and Contemporary Music. In the last several years he’s gigged extensively – around his home base in the Hudson Valley with a band that included Giardullo, bassist Steve Rust, and drummer Harvey Sorgen, and in NYC with a trio featuring Giardullo and drummer Todd Capp. Rich has played NYC’s Knitting Factory and CB’s Gallery, as well as pianist David Arner’s “New Vanguard” series in Kingston N.Y. He has performed as a member of composer Sarah Weaver’s Soundpainting Orchestra at Roulette in NYC. Other collaborators have included bassists Mark Dresser, Michael Bisio, Lisle Ellis, and Dominic Duval; composer Pauline Oliveros; saxophonists Joe McPhee, Jim Finn, Elliott Levin, and Chris Kelsey; drummers Jackson Krall and Donald Robinson; and fellow guitarist Dom Minasi.

Rosenthal recorded Falling Up, his debut album as a leader, in 2012. The album features several original compositions, as well as original arrangements of tunes by Steve Lacy and Jimmy Lyons. His band on the album comprises his frequent confederate Giardullo, long-time friend, bassist Craig Nixon, and drummer Matt Crane. Commitment to a common cause is important to Rosenthal. “It was very important to me to have guys who were willing to rehearse the music until it was ready to record,” he says. “These guys were. They had my back.” Rosenthal’s current working band includes Nixon, saxophonist Chris Kelsey, and drummer Dean Sharp.

Summing up his philosophy, Rosenthal says, “What I strive for in my music is to let all my life experiences come out through the music. My personal struggles and triumphs. Music to me is not about doing fancy or tricky things on an instrument, but to make music that moves people.”

François Grillot Biography

Since François Grillot arrived from Paris in 1980, he has been a part of the story of jazz and improvised music in New York City.

Soon after acquiring his very first contrabass, he started playing around town. One of his first regular gigs was with guitarist Bill Bickford at the legendary Augie’s jazz club, which was an important proving ground for up-and-coming jazz artists.

While maintaining a busy schedule of performing around New York City, François devoted much time and energy to the study of his craft: he studied jazz harmony and writing at City College of NY, took lessons with Linda McKnight, and studied at the East Harlem Music School run by Johnny Colon. He also participated in workshops run by Barry Harris, Dave Holland and Jazz Mobile, among others.

Throughout the 90’s, François continued to develop his style and artistry, performing in a multitude of clubs and bars throughout New York City, working with Bill Bickford, Harold Danko, Mike Clark, Ken Hatfield, and many others.

In 1994, he met Matt Lavelle at the Rainy Daze Jam Session, which had a major impact on his musical direction. The two began a fruitful musical partnership that continues today. They began to rehearse regularly in François’ Hell’s Kitchen apartment (in the kitchen, coincidentally) and developed their own approach to playing standards that stretched the music nearly into free improvisation, but always came back to the theme. This process of rigorous, disciplined, yet soulful experimentation remains a salient characteristic of François’ working method and artistry.

François has collaborated with many of jazz’s most creative and distinguished practitioners: Albey Balgochian, Louie Belogenis, Charles Burnham, Daniel Carter, Roy Campbell, Will Connell, Robert Dick, Marc Edwards, Charles Gayle, Burton Greene, Lou Grassi, William Hooker, Jason Hwang, Jackson Krall, Klaus Kugel, Daniel Levin, Mat Maneri, Michael Marcus, Sabir Mateen, Dom Minasi, Anders Nilsson, Bern Nix, Kevin Norton, William Parker, Jay Rosen, Steve Swell, Michael T.A. Thompson, Michael Wimberly, and many others.

He performs in jazz clubs throughout New York City and beyond, including 55 Bar, Barbes, Bowery Poetry Club, The Knitting Factory, The Lenox Lounge, Zebulon, and, until they was closed down a few years ago, the historic venues CBGB’s and Tonic. François’ festival performances include repeat appearances at New York’s Vision Festival and Hell’s Kitchen Festival, The Montreal Jazz Festival, and throughout Europe, most recently at the Umea Jazz Festival in Sweden.

Early Days

François, age 8, attended the local music school of Chatenoy-le- Royal, and played the cornet in it’s marching band. Then took guitar lessons with Alain Licandro, which lead to the electric bass, playing local bands., and starting to improvise and write. 1978, recorded and toured with Edition Speciale, of guitarist Mimi Lorenzini (RCA – Horizon Digital) 1979, recorded and toured with Mama Bea Tekielski (RCA – Le Chaos) 1980, was playing Ska in London with locals and came back to Burgundy to record with Drummer Serge Bringolf (Omega – Strave) Move to New York in late 1980 and has been living there since.

Tom Cabrera Biography

A Native of Long Island, NY, drummer and multi-percussionist Tom Cabrera began his career in local rock, folk-rock and country bands, but his love of jazz percolated and took over his music making. Early on both a musician and visual artist/painter, Tom was drawn into the world of graphic arts but music soon took over his life and he became a mainstay on the Hudson Valley NY scene.

Cabrera relocated to Orlando, FL, but not before acquiring a frame drum, an event that would prove auspicious to his future work. In Florida Tom gigged constantly, establishing himself as one of the most respected players on the jazz scene there. After meeting his future wife, singer Julie Lyon, they went on to form the Julie Lyon Quartet, a swinging ensemble and released their live album Between Then and Now.

Tom and Julie pulled up stakes, settled back up in the New York metropolitan area and assembled a quintet of remarkable musicians for their Unseen Rain Records release Julie (UR9957).

Tom Cabrera’s Unseen Rain recordings include Julie (UR9957) with the Julie Lyon Quintet,  the trios Lion Hearted (UR9980) and Sumari (UR9962) and his duo with the JLQ’s guitarist Jack DeSalvo have released several albums, among them are Tales of Coming Home (UR9986), Libra Moon (UR9978) and Juniper (UR9966). Soon to be released is Rocco John Iacovone’s Embrace The Change (UR9947) featuring Tom Cabrera on drums and Julie Lyon’s next album is in the works.

In addition to being an incomparable jazz drummer, Cabrera is an adept world percussionist, often adding to the proceedings instruments from all over the planet, particularly the middle-east.

EMBRACE THE CHANGE – ROCCO JOHN QUARTET (UR9947)

 

Rocco_Front1

10.99 – High Definition 24/96 FLAC

9.99 – CD Quality FLAC

8.99 – MP3

EMBRACE THE CHANGE – ROCCO JOHN QUARTET
ROCCO JOHN IACOVONE alto and soprano saxophones
RICH ROSENTHAL guitar
FRANÇOIS GRILLOT double-bass
TOM CABRERA drums
According to saxophonist and composer Rocco John Iacovone, “EMBRACE THE CHANGE is a thought, an idea, and a philosophy.  It’s a comment on our evolution as human beings. It seems the only constant we experience is change and we constantly need to learn how to deal with it. To do this, we have to dig deep. These were the thoughts behind the compositions as I wrote them, and as we went into the studio.”Rocco John Iacovone’s studies with the legendary Lee Konitz and Sam Rivers as well as studies in composition under the direct disciples of Nadia Boulanger gives him a wide swath of musicial influences that color each track of EMBRACE THE CHANGE. His stellar quartet gets deep into the leader’s music, designed to elicit unmitigated passion and creativity from Rich Rosenthal, François Grillot and Tom Cabrera.

Rocco describes each album track in the liner notes:

WINGS   7’21: A free bop piece to free up our thoughts.
CIRCUITS   8’08: However remote or even impossible it may seem, we are all connected.
ESCAPE   8’39: The traps are all set up, wherever we turn. We need to escape the traps and think
independently and creatively.
DIAL UP   8’00:  This represents calling for assistance from the universe.
TANGO   9’52: The dance of life.
WHISPERS   4’32: While we all hear the loud voices telling us what to do and how to do it, we
really need to quiet down and listen to the whispers of our inner self.
72’s   10’56: Connection to the Endless.
Wings (Epilogue)   7:51: The Joy of it all.

All music by Rocco John Iacovone

Recorded March, 2015 and mixed at Urban Sound Studios, Riverdale, NJ by Todd Urban
Mastered at Beanstudio, Wayne, NJ by Jim DeSalvo
Cover painting by Denise Iacovone
Design by Qua’s Eye Graphix

Produced by Jack DeSalvo

 

Rocco John Iacovone Biography

Composer/Saxophones/Piano Rocco John Iacovone studied privately with Lee Konitz. He holds a BA and Master’s degree in Composition from Hunter College where he studied classical music under the direct disciples of Nadia Boulanger. To round out his education, he went on to study and perform under the direction of Sam Rivers’ Orchestral Explorations at the Studio Rivbea in NYC. Rocco has been actively involved in composing, performing, and teaching ever since.

Presently, in addition to composing and performing events with his arts group, The Coalition of Creative Artists (COCA), Rocco John plays regularly in NYC with the Rocco John Group. Most recently he has been active playing in groups other than his own. Rocco also has a recurring summer Jazz residency in Alaska playing original and straight-ahead jazz with his group “Rare Form”.

Rocco cut his teeth playing first Alto in Sam Rivers’ “Orchestral Explorations” at the Studio Rivbea during the “loft” years. He’s played with Karl Berger, Barry Atschul, the Jazz Composers Orchestra, Larry Grenadier and Phil Grenadier. His years of study with Lee Konitz, and training under Sam Rivers helped Rocco create a compositional and playing style that often reflects Lee’s emphasis on tasteful restraint combined with Sam’s sense of adventurous abstraction. Given his musical training, and classical influences, it is no surprise that Rocco’s music blurs the lines between “in” and “out” playing; creating a link between the two for the audience to follow. Audience participation is important to Rocco’s philosophy of sharing the universal aspect of music. He encourages his audience to be active listeners, and sometimes runs shows, through COCA, that encourage audience participation in multiple disciplines in a very tangible way.

In addition to performing and recording, Rocco is dedicated to the idea of strengthening the Jazz idiom by passing the music on to the next generation. To that end Rocco has spent many years as a Teaching Artist, teaching Jazz, Improvisation and Jazz History. Rocco frequently gives Jazz residencies with his band and has been the recipient of three Chamber Music America Residency Grants. Rocco does Jazz residencies and workshops all around the world.

Rocco has a number of CD’s as leader. They feature The Rocco John Group. The first one, “Miles To Go”, is a free approach to a collection of original and standard tunes. The second CD, “Don’t wait too Long…”is comprised entirely of original tunes by Rocco. Their third CD, also all originals, is called Devotion, and it is a dedication album to some of Rocco’s Jazz favorites. Like the others, has garnered critical acclaim. There are also four CD’s with RARE FORM. RARE FORM is Rocco’s duo with Murray Nash (composition/keyboard/bass), his collaborator in Alaska. The CD’s: “Live at the Fairview”, “Please Seat Yourself” and “Conversation in 3”are freewheeling interpretations of standards and originals. The fourth CD, “Lose Yer Blues” features original music by both artists.

Rocco has additional collaborative CDs with other groups., and is working on original music for his Octet, The Improvisational Composers Ensemble. Rocco started ICE as a platform for composers whose work features improvisation as a compositional element. He has played his original suites with ICE at Arlene’s, Piano’s and The Stone, and continues to write for this ensemble.

Rocco can often be heard in NYC and has recently played at Nu-Blu, Pianos, Arlene’s, Clemente Soto velez, Freddie’s, ABC No Rio, Shape Shifter Lounge, The Downtown Music gallery, Culture fix, Zirzamin, Goodbye Blue Monday and others. He can be heard most summers with Rare Form, in Talkeetna Alaska. For his schedule, go to www.roccojohnmusic.com.

Rich Rosenthal Biography

Guitarist/composer Rich Rosenthal has weathered a life of hard work, hard study, and hard knocks, and on the way developed a jazz-derived avant-garde style that places a premium on originality, spontaneity, and the intense expression of straight-forward emotion. Rich’s goal is, above all, to communicate on a profound level. In that quest, he draws from not only the obvious inspirations – great free jazz artists like Ornette Coleman and Cecil Taylor – but also from straight-ahead jazz guitarists like Tal Farlow and Pat Martino, as well as classical composers like J.S. Bach and Hector Villa Lobos. His is a vastly personal music that he hopes will allow listeners to, as he says, “transcend the mundane … take them to another place.”

Rosenthal was born in the Bronx N.Y., on Oct.15th 1964. His father, a WW II veteran, owned a dental lab and worked as a dental technician in a V.A. hospital. His mother worked in a school cafeteria. Neither parent was musical, but his father was a jazz lover. Rich grew-up hearing the sounds of Paul Desmond, Dave Brubeck, Ahmad Jamal, and Errol Garner around the house. An older brother introduced Rosenthal to the music of Carlos Santana, which inspired him to begin playing music. Rich’s parents bought the twelve-year-old a twenty-five-dollar acoustic guitar. He took lessons from a distant cousin, jazz guitarist Dave Moreno. Besides teaching him the basics, Moreno lent him recordings by great blues, jazz, and rock guitarists.

Moreno also imparted his love of jazz’s cutting edge, taking the aspiring guitarist to New York City performances by such eminent free jazz musicians as Coleman, Steve Lacy, Jimmy Lyons, Sun Ra, among many others. Rich was befriended by two associates of Taylor, Glen Spearman and Raphe Malik, who encouraged him to pursue his music.

When it came time to attend high school, Rich wanted to attend NYC’s prestigious High School of Music and Art. His parents were dead set against a career in music, however, so instead Rich attended a business-oriented high school. The effect was devastating. Depression led to drug and alcohol addiction. Still, he kept playing. His parents moved to Wappingers Falls, NY, where Rosenthal attended Roy C. Ketcham High School. He joined the school’s jazz ensemble and took guitar lessons from Poughkeepsie guitarist Dave Woods. He also studied with jazz guitarist Eddie Diehl.

After high school, Rosenthal joined the Steamfitters Union and stopped taking music lessons, though he managed to play on his own, with friends and at local jam sessions. Substance-abuse problems persisted, however, and he eventually stopped playing altogether. In 1991, after years in the wilderness, Rosenthal got clean. Dave Moreno was by that time living in Manhattan. Rich resumed lessons with his mentor. He studied mostly classical guitar with Moreno for two years, before deciding once and for all to concentrate on his own jazz-based music. To that end he studied with the composer Edgar Grana, and began attending college classes, first at Mercy College, where he studied with, among others, Ornette Coleman’s guitarist, Kenny Wessel. At the same time, he worked as a pipe-fitter for the MTA and played standard jazz gigs around Westchester County.

After a year at Mercy, Rich transferred to the New School Jazz and Contemporary Music Music Program. It was a stressful period, balancing a full-time day gig with the school’s strict requirements, but studies with the likes of Andrew Cyrille, Richard Boukas, Bruce Arnold, Kurk Nurock and Bill Kirchner made it worthwhile. An especially important aspect was the opportunity to have the school’s ensembles play his original compositions.

Rosenthal began playing with saxophonist/composer Joe Giardullo, who became a major influence on his work. They played free and developed arrangements of compositions by Thelonious Monk, Paul Motian, and Anthony Braxton, to name a few. Giardullo also introduced him to George Russell’s Lydian Chromatic Concept, as well as the compositional techniques of Wadada Leo Smith, and Giardullo’s own Gravity Music concept.

The 2000s saw Rosenthal’s music career gain momentum. In 2005 he recorded the critically-acclaimed album Red Morocco with Giardullo for RogueArt Records. A year later, he graduated from the New School with a B.F.A. in Jazz and Contemporary Music. In the last several years he’s gigged extensively – around his home base in the Hudson Valley with a band that included Giardullo, bassist Steve Rust, and drummer Harvey Sorgen, and in NYC with a trio featuring Giardullo and drummer Todd Capp. Rich has played NYC’s Knitting Factory and CB’s Gallery, as well as pianist David Arner’s “New Vanguard” series in Kingston N.Y. He has performed as a member of composer Sarah Weaver’s Soundpainting Orchestra at Roulette in NYC. Other collaborators have included bassists Mark Dresser, Michael Bisio, Lisle Ellis, and Dominic Duval; composer Pauline Oliveros; saxophonists Joe McPhee, Jim Finn, Elliott Levin, and Chris Kelsey; drummers Jackson Krall and Donald Robinson; and fellow guitarist Dom Minasi.

Rosenthal recorded Falling Up, his debut album as a leader, in 2012. The album features several original compositions, as well as original arrangements of tunes by Steve Lacy and Jimmy Lyons. His band on the album comprises his frequent confederate Giardullo, long-time friend, bassist Craig Nixon, and drummer Matt Crane. Commitment to a common cause is important to Rosenthal. “It was very important to me to have guys who were willing to rehearse the music until it was ready to record,” he says. “These guys were. They had my back.” Rosenthal’s current working band includes Nixon, saxophonist Chris Kelsey, and drummer Dean Sharp.

Summing up his philosophy, Rosenthal says, “What I strive for in my music is to let all my life experiences come out through the music. My personal struggles and triumphs. Music to me is not about doing fancy or tricky things on an instrument, but to make music that moves people.”

François Grillot Biography

Since François Grillot arrived from Paris in 1980, he has been a part of the story of jazz and improvised music in New York City.

Soon after acquiring his very first contrabass, he started playing around town. One of his first regular gigs was with guitarist Bill Bickford at the legendary Augie’s jazz club, which was an important proving ground for up-and-coming jazz artists.

While maintaining a busy schedule of performing around New York City, François devoted much time and energy to the study of his craft: he studied jazz harmony and writing at City College of NY, took lessons with Linda McKnight, and studied at the East Harlem Music School run by Johnny Colon. He also participated in workshops run by Barry Harris, Dave Holland and Jazz Mobile, among others.

Throughout the 90’s, François continued to develop his style and artistry, performing in a multitude of clubs and bars throughout New York City, working with Bill Bickford, Harold Danko, Mike Clark, Ken Hatfield, and many others.

In 1994, he met Matt Lavelle at the Rainy Daze Jam Session, which had a major impact on his musical direction. The two began a fruitful musical partnership that continues today. They began to rehearse regularly in François’ Hell’s Kitchen apartment (in the kitchen, coincidentally) and developed their own approach to playing standards that stretched the music nearly into free improvisation, but always came back to the theme. This process of rigorous, disciplined, yet soulful experimentation remains a salient characteristic of François’ working method and artistry.

François has collaborated with many of jazz’s most creative and distinguished practitioners: Albey Balgochian, Louie Belogenis, Charles Burnham, Daniel Carter, Roy Campbell, Will Connell, Robert Dick, Marc Edwards, Charles Gayle, Burton Greene, Lou Grassi, William Hooker, Jason Hwang, Jackson Krall, Klaus Kugel, Daniel Levin, Mat Maneri, Michael Marcus, Sabir Mateen, Dom Minasi, Anders Nilsson, Bern Nix, Kevin Norton, William Parker, Jay Rosen, Steve Swell, Michael T.A. Thompson, Michael Wimberly, and many others.

He performs in jazz clubs throughout New York City and beyond, including 55 Bar, Barbes, Bowery Poetry Club, The Knitting Factory, The Lenox Lounge, Zebulon, and, until they was closed down a few years ago, the historic venues CBGB’s and Tonic. François’ festival performances include repeat appearances at New York’s Vision Festival and Hell’s Kitchen Festival, The Montreal Jazz Festival, and throughout Europe, most recently at the Umea Jazz Festival in Sweden.

Early Days

François, age 8, attended the local music school of Chatenoy-le- Royal, and played the cornet in it’s marching band. Then took guitar lessons with Alain Licandro, which lead to the electric bass, playing local bands., and starting to improvise and write. 1978, recorded and toured with Edition Speciale, of guitarist Mimi Lorenzini (RCA – Horizon Digital) 1979, recorded and toured with Mama Bea Tekielski (RCA – Le Chaos) 1980, was playing Ska in London with locals and came back to Burgundy to record with Drummer Serge Bringolf (Omega – Strave) Move to New York in late 1980 and has been living there since.

Tom Cabrera Biography

A Native of Long Island, NY, drummer and multi-percussionist Tom Cabrera began his career in local rock, folk-rock and country bands, but his love of jazz percolated and took over his music making. Early on both a musician and visual artist/painter, Tom was drawn into the world of graphic arts but music soon took over his life and he became a mainstay on the Hudson Valley NY scene.

Cabrera relocated to Orlando, FL, but not before acquiring a frame drum, an event that would prove auspicious to his future work. In Florida Tom gigged constantly, establishing himself as one of the most respected players on the jazz scene there. After meeting his future wife, singer Julie Lyon, they went on to form the Julie Lyon Quartet, a swinging ensemble and released their live album Between Then and Now.

Tom and Julie pulled up stakes, settled back up in the New York metropolitan area and assembled a quintet of remarkable musicians for their Unseen Rain Records release Julie (UR9957).

Tom Cabrera’s Unseen Rain recordings include Julie (UR9957) with the Julie Lyon Quintet,  the trios Lion Hearted (UR9980) and Sumari (UR9962) and his duo with the JLQ’s guitarist Jack DeSalvo have released several albums, among them are Tales of Coming Home (UR9986), Libra Moon (UR9978) and Juniper (UR9966). Soon to be released is Rocco John Iacovone’s Embrace The Change (UR9947) featuring Tom Cabrera on drums and Julie Lyon’s next album is in the works.

In addition to being an incomparable jazz drummer, Cabrera is an adept world percussionist, often adding to the proceedings instruments from all over the planet, particularly the middle-east.

Review of Sumari from Russia

SUMARI CD Review from Russia
 
By Leonid Auskern
 

Jazz 6/14/2015 

Matt Lavelle (trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn, pocket trumpet, alto clarinet Jack DeSalvo (mandola, cello, guitars) Tom Cabrera (bodhrán, tar, riq, doumbek, bass drum, percussion)
Matt Lavelle (trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn, pocket trumpet, alto clarinet
Jack DeSalvo (mandola, cello, guitars)
Tom Cabrera (bodhrán, tar, riq, doumbek, bass drum, percussion)

Quite recently I happened to hear all three participants of the Sumari project when I reviewed the JULIE album by the Julie Lyon Quintet. On JULIE their instrumental skill drew attention to these musicians. But it’s one thing to accompany a vocalist in the performance of standards, and quite another to create your own project. We hear quite different music on Sumari and it’s reinforced by a spiritual component common to all participants. To illustrate this thesis, let us remember the extraordinary personality of Jane Roberts. This American writer would fall into a trance and channeled an otherworldly entity named Seth (basically, a name in Egyptian mythology). Roberts outlined Seth’s discourses in “Seth Speaks” and in a number of subsequent books which were of an ethical and metaphysical nature aimed at enhancing the capacity of human self-knowledge. Many years ago, Cabrera and DeSalvo got acquainted with the works of Roberts, leaving them a deep impression, and they casually turned on Lavelle to these ideas. The current CD booklet of the trio is equipped with quotes from Seth and Roberts and the name of the project and the album is a term from the books meaning “Federation of consciousness”. Without touching the more ideological component of the album, let’s go straight to the music.

I listened to this album with great interest and pleasure. All three musicians have already established a solid foundation in jazz, all three are closely connected with downtown culture of the New York avant-garde and all three are adept at free improvisation. To begin with, their instrumentation shows that this is no ordinary project; trumpet (and its variants) plus alto clarinet by Matt Lavelle. Jack DeSalvo on cello, mandola and guitar. Multiplicitous percussion instruments of various timbre and volume are played by Tom Cabrera. This is a three man orchestra of horns-strings-drums. Such a wide arsenal allows these players to make their music unusually rich and diverse. Their improvisations can be ethnically motivated (this is especially noticeable in the Counterparts Are Comparitively Encountered). Without losing the entire freedom of the music, what is visible is the melodic basis of all of the compositions. Impressive is the sky-high steaming trumpet, in which passages of just a few notes sometimes seem infinite, with literally hypnotic themes develop in “Alternate Presents and Multiple Focus”, while a highly energetic finale awaits you at “The Gates of Horn”. In short, a very unusual, very creative recording that is far from free-jazz excesses. This is how I would summarize my impressions of Sumari.

http://jazzquad.ru/index.pl?act=PRODUCT&id=4154

High Definition Apple Lossless Download $10.99

High Definition FLAC Download $10.99

CD quality Apple Lossless Download $9.99

CD quality FLAC Download $9.99

mp3 320k (recommended for iTunes users) $8.99

Reviews of SUMARI (UR9962)

Sumari

Matt Lavelle (trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn, pocket trumpet, alto clarinet Jack DeSalvo (mandola, cello, guitars) Tom Cabrera (bodhrán, tar, riq, doumbek, bass drum, percussion)


By: JOHN SHARPE, NYC Jazz Record

Sumari NYC Jazz Record


By: GREGO APPLEGATE EDWARDS

“There are so many excellent modern and avant jazz musicians headquartered in the New York City area today. It confirms the status of New York as a jazz capital of the world, certainly, yet there are fewer and fewer venues to play in. It becomes all the more important for lovers of the music to get to the gigs and show support, and of course buy the CDs.Three New York figures come front and center as very good examples of New York being now on the album Sumari (Unseen Rain 9962). On it we have the trio of Matt Lavelle on trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn, pocket trumpet and alto clarinet, Jack DeSalvo on mandola, cello and guitar, and Tom Cabrera on bodhran, tar, riq, doumbek, bass drum and miscellaneous percussion.

 This is vibrantly eclectic avant jazz with world influences and a flowingly harmolodic sense. Matt plays the trumpet etc. with a mastery that shows an encompassing of the tradition and the essence of the moment. He has much to say and he comes to say it eloquently on the set. There are especially interesting tonal qualities he gets from alternating fingerings on notes, creating timbral and microtonal openings that are quite stimulating to hear. His switch from bass clarinet to alto clarinet recently has inspired him to play some of his very best reed work here as well. Jack on his battery of instruments lays down foundational sounds that sometimes function as a double bass might do in such a trio setting. Other times they function as a second solo voice. And sometimes as a sort of “world” riffing instrument. He sounds just right here. Tom similarly gives us rhythmic drive and freedom that functions sometimes in the role of the “drum set,” other times with more overtly world connotations. He is key too to the success of the date. 

What’s nice about this one is the very together qualities of the trio as a whole. They are free yet they also have a world-homogenous quality to them. Matt plays some of his best music on disk. Jack and Tom create the varied and creative framework that makes it all work. I am very happy to hear this one. The trio comes at us with strength and ideas. It all works. It’s all very New York, which means there is the local and the universal all wrapped up into a very “now” music. Excellent!”


 

By: GRADY HARP, amazon.com

“Sumari – three post-modern multi-instrumentalist shamans channeling intrepid music that extends into jazz, new music, folk and World music. Matt Lavelle, Jack DeSalvo and Tom Cabrera initiated daily open air improv sessions more than two decades ago. During a lunch at Schlomo’s in Nanuet, NY, Cabrera presented Lavelle, then barely out of his teens, with the seminal book Seth Speaks. Both Cabrera and DeSalvo had previously read Seth Speaks and the subsequent volumes by Jane Roberts. The depth of the young trumpet student’s spiritual journey was greatly affected by the book and also eventually prompted bold choices in his career as a jazz musician, improvisor and composer. He would eventually add alto clarinet (and sometimes bass clarinet) as well as the closer family members of the trumpet including flugelhorn, cornet and pocket trumpet. His growth into a master improviser is documented on many recordings including for the Unseen Rain Label. Drummer and percussionist Tom Cabrera had been a fixture on the Hudson Valley jazz scene already when the trio first got together. Know for swinging various ensembles, Tom had picked up a middle eastern frame drum and began to play it during the trio’s daily out door sessions. Tom’s career as took him the Orlando with the Julie Lyon Quartet as well as his own trio but his interest in transcultural percussion only grew.

Other-world art music. Improvisations through space and time. The soundtrack of twilight. These phrases have all been used to attempt to describe this trio known as Sumari. The channeling of free improvisation and global folk culture with a boundless sense of the new – that is what makes this collection of works so bizarre and mesmerizing.”


By: PACHI TAPIZ, tomajazz.com

“The trio formed by Matt Lavelle (trumpet, pocket trumpet, alto clarinet, cornet, flugelhorn), Jack DeSalvo (cello, guitar and mandola), and Tom Cabrera (various percussion), offers in Sumari a proposal of free improvisation that invites the listener to succumb to this music. When the label “free improvisation” appears in the description of an artistic proposal, in many cases we react with a litany of preconceptions (which I will not repeat here). This time the ensemble shows one of the multiple faces that are present in a genre so polyhedral.

On Sumari melodies dominate throughout the entire recording. This is coupled with the wide variety of timbres emanating from the vast number of instruments employed by the three musicians; more than one dozen according to the list that is included in the folder of the CD. This include a wide variety of small ethnic percussions, both woodwind and brass instruments, in addition to the guitar, cello and the mandola. This different approach to presenting improvisation focuses on the interaction of the musicians forming an important essential element. “Reincarnational Civilizations” has an open, almost cinematic character. “Alternate Presents and Multiple Focus” has magnificent development; after a slow start in which trumpet established direction followed in his speech by his two companions, the piece increases tempo getting the twelve-minute elapsed in a jiffy.

The last two parts provide a new dimension to the music of the trio: “The Gates Of Horn” brings back to memory issues of traditional music, while the short “The Nature of Mass Events” refers to their roots, African-American jazz, and is a great paradigm of how free improvisation can be just the opposite to what sometimes is it supposed to be. All this takes place after the magnificent beginning with “Seth Dance”, “Counterparts Are Comparetively Encountered” and “Scientific Cults and Private Paranoia” both allow the listener to focus on the ability of the trio to create instant melodies.”


By: LEONID AUSKERN, jazzquad.ru

“Quite recently I happened to hear all three participants of the Sumari project when I reviewed the JULIE album by the Julie Lyon Quintet. On JULIE their instrumental skill drew attention to these musicians. But it’s one thing to accompany a vocalist in the performance of standards, and quite another to create your own project. We hear quite different music on Sumari and it’s reinforced by a spiritual component common to all participants. To illustrate this thesis, let us remember the extraordinary personality of Jane Roberts. This American writer would fall into a trance and channeled an otherworldly entity named Seth (basically, a name in Egyptian mythology). Roberts outlined Seth’s discourses in “Seth Speaks” and in a number of subsequent books which were of an ethical and metaphysical nature aimed at enhancing the capacity of human self-knowledge. Many years ago, Cabrera and DeSalvo got acquainted with the works of Roberts, leaving them a deep impression, and they casually turned on Lavelle to these ideas. The current CD booklet of the trio is equipped with quotes from Seth and Roberts and the name of the project and the album is a term from the books meaning “Federation of consciousness”. Without touching the more ideological component of the album, let’s go straight to the music.

I listened to this album with great interest and pleasure. All three musicians have already established a solid foundation in jazz, all three are closely connected with downtown culture of the New York avant-garde and all three are adept at free improvisation. To begin with, their instrumentation shows that this is no ordinary project; trumpet (and its variants) plus alto clarinet by Matt Lavelle. Jack DeSalvo on cello, mandola and guitar. Multiplicitous percussion instruments of various timbre and volume are played by Tom Cabrera. This is a three man orchestra of horns-strings-drums. Such a wide arsenal allows these players to make their music unusually rich and diverse. Their improvisations can be ethnically motivated (this is especially noticeable in the Counterparts Are Comparitively Encountered). Without losing the entire freedom of the music, what is visible is the melodic basis of all of the compositions. Impressive is the sky-high steaming trumpet, in which passages of just a few notes sometimes seem infinite, with literally hypnotic themes develop in “Alternate Presents and Multiple Focus”, while a highly energetic finale awaits you at “The Gates of Horn”. In short, a very unusual, very creative recording that is far from free-jazz excesses. This is how I would summarize my impressions of Sumari.”


 

By: DAWOUD KRINGLE, www.doobeedoobeedoo.info

Sumari is the new CD produced by Jack DeSalvo, and features DeSalvo on cello, guitar, and mandola, Matt Lavelle on trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn, pocket trumpet, and alto clarinet, and Tom Cabrera on dumbeq, rik, drums, bass drum, and percussion.A cello ostinanto in a smoothly executed cycle of 5 & ½ beats and brushes on cymbals opens the first track “Seth Dances.” A horn line eases in and fulfills the musical statement that began. The stark, minimal structure evokes a sense of movement within a vast space; a glacial landscape wherein at the forefront the piece’s namesake performs a dance invocation. One is confronted with the imagery in an intense, uncompromising impression upon the senses. After an impassioned consummation of the sound, the musicians wring out every possibility from the piece before drawing it to a close.

“Counterparts are Comparatively Encountered” starts with a free form dialogue between the cello and alto clarinet. Percussions lurk with mysterious playfulness in the background. Things take a decidedly jazzy turn without loosing the abstract setting the piece began with. Somehow, the group actually makes free form improvisation swing. The remainder of the CD (no, I won’t go for a “song by song” breakdown. After all, I wouldn’t want to put any spoilers here!) has a lot of truly inspired moments. Jack DeSalvo brings a simultaneous intimacy and expansion of tonal and musical ideas to the cello. On “The Gates of Horn” he makes imaginative use of the mandola. It was clear he was the axis, the musical foundation of this project. Matt Lavelle upholds his well deserved reputation as a skilled and inspired musician. His work on this CD reiterates his position. That said, Lavelle’s work on the arcane alto clarinet is worthy of special mention. He has brought the instrument from the shadows and is showing the world her musical secrets that public prejudice has hidden. Tom Cabrera’s work on this collection shows an amazing spectrum of musical ideas. His presence here is indispensable, yet his performance is subtle and almost subliminal in the way it insinuates both the necessary and the unique to this music. The music on Sumari does what it promised. It opens the way for an extra-dimensional world to communicate its ideas and feelings to us.”

SUMARI BIOS

Sumari 2

Matt LavelleJack DeSalvoTom Cabrera

Each member of SUMARI is a veteran of the US and international Jazz worlds with roots in NYC’s Downtown scene.

JACK DeSALVO, hailed in THE WIRE magazine as “masterful”, joined Ronald Shannon Jackson’s Decoding Society in the 1980s and has toured the world with many artists in his own musical-spiritual journey. A graduate of the Berklee College of Music, DeSalvo also studied classical guitar and composition before taking private tutelage with Bill Connors. His pianistic, wholistic approach to performance practice on electric, classical and acoustic guitar led to committed doubling on such instruments as cello and various members of the mandolin and banjo families. DeSalvo appears on more than 40 recordings and has performed with Peter Brötzmann, Karl Berger, Chris Kelsey,  Tony Malaby, Pat Hall, D3 and many more as well at major jazz festivals and clubs.

MATT LAVELLE, having studied directly with Ornette Coleman, was one-fourth of Bern Nix’s band and a founding member of Harmolodic Monk. His haunting trumpet sound is reminiscent of Don Cherry’s, while one can also note the full-throated influence of Rex Stewart. Lavelle’s first teacher was swing-era veteran Hildred Humphries but his foray into the unfettered carries him beyond traditions. Strong doubling into woodwinds brought him to the bass clarinet and ultimately, the alto clarinet. Lavelle makes extreme use of the alto’s natural range, fusing it with the cry of Dolphy’s bass clarinet sound and then into the imaginary realm of Eastern double-reeds painted New Orleans blue. Lavelle’s extensive resume includes Giuseppe Logan, William Parker, Sabir Mateen, Jameel Moondoc, Roy Campbell, and his own12 Houses Orchestra.

TOM CABRERA is a percussionist of striking depth. An in-demand jazz drummer who also made a specialty of the percussion family known as frame drums, Cabrera constructed a drum-set which sports riq, tar, dumbeq, bodhran and various percussives about a small bass drum and hi-hat. With a sonic oeuvre that ranges from the quaking to the sublime, Tom carries the band’s rhythmicity in the best harmolodic fashion. Silences (the sort described by Cage) feature into his wave of sounds. With Sumari Cabrera also plays a standard drumset as well as with the Julie Lyon Quintet, the Rocco John Quartet and others. Besides his own Tom Cabrera Trio album, What I’ve Found, he appears on many Unseen Rain releases.

Matt Lavelle – trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn, pocket trumpet, alto and bassclarinet

Jack DeSalvo – guitars, cello, mandola and mandolin,  banjos, bass ukelele

Tom Cabrera – drums, dumbeq, rik, frame drums, percussion.

 

UNSEEN RAIN FESTIVAL April 12, ShapeShifter

 

February 19, 2015To: Listings/Critics/Features
From: Jazz Promo Services
Press Contact: Jim Eigo, jim@jazzpromoservices.com
www.jazzpromoservices.com 
UNSEEN RAIN FESTIVAL
presents
Visionary Sounds @ ShapeShifter Lab
with Sumari
Pat Hall’s Time Remembered Organ Group,and Harmolodic Monk
Event: Unseen Rain Festival When: Sunday, April 12, 7PM–Sumari, 8PM-Pat Hall’s Time Remembered Organ Group, 9PM-Harmolodic Monk
Where: ShapeShifter Lab
18 Whitwell Place, Brooklyn, NY 11215
Admission: $15.
The artist-directed independent label, Unseen Rain Records, is bold in concept, producing radically expansive recordings of innovative jazz and improvised music. UR’s array of CDs and digital downloads have been hailed as “visionary” in the international media. The Unseen Rain Festival will feature three vastly different improvisational music ensembles that offered recent releases. The event unites them under the label’s banner.SUMARI: The evening will open with the “other-world art music” of Sumari. The channeling of free improv and global folk culture with a boundless sense of the new are the path coursed by Matt Lavelle (trumpet, flugelhorn, alto clarinet), Jack DeSalvo (cello, electric and acoustic guitars, mandola, banjo) and Tom Cabrera (drumset, dumbeq, bodhran, tar, riq, percussion) to conjure abstract yet familiar sound tapestries. The band members individually have held ground with such noted avant jazz strongholds as Ronald Shannon Jackson’s Decoding Society, the Bern Nix Quartet and Jameel Moondoc’s ensembles, among many others.

PAT HALL’S TIME REMEMBERED ORGAN GROUP: Trombonist Pat Hall, a veteran of the Wadada Leo Smith’s ensembles, will perform with the combo heard on his starkly original album “Time Remembered: a Tribute to Bill Evans”. Hall’s Time Remembered Organ Group—a lasting ensemble, not a one-shot tribute project–will offer unique adaptations of Evans’ immortal music. The album has been acclaimed by critics, celebrating the bold concept and arrangements of this jazz icon’s compositions. Joining Hall are Greg “Organ Monk” Lewis (Hammond B3), Marvin Sewell (guitar) and Mike Campenni (drumset). Hall’s other UR releases include “Multiple Question Choice” and “K3rnel PaN1C” as well as “Happy House” with Chris Kelsey

HARMOLODIC MONK: The evening will close with the duet of Matt Lavelle (trumpet, flugelhorn, alto clarinet) and John Pietaro (vibraphone, hand drums, frame drums, percussion) aka Harmolodic Monk. The pair perform the repertoire of Thelonious Monk, reconstructed by way of Ornette Coleman’s music-liberating philosophy. The pedigree is there: Lavelle spent years studying with Coleman and still performs with Bern Nix; Pietaro is a mainstay of Karl Berger’s Improvisers Orchestra. Harmolodic Monk’s debut release, called “Disc of the Year” by several new music bloggers, compels listeners with blurred harmonies, stinging accents, crushes, soaring melodic lines and at least a little bit of the shock of the new.

UNSEEN RAIN RECORDS: MAKING THE INVISIBLE AUDIBLE…

UNSEEN RAIN is visionary record label offering jazz and improvised music by contemporary innovators on various media. UR is focused on high production values and recognizes the entire process surrounding a recording as art.

UR recordings are available in a number of formats, High Definition FLAC, CD quality FLAC, Apple Lossless and maximum quality mp3 (320k) as well as select titles on CD and soon, audiophile quality LPs.

UNSEEN RAIN’s community of players, composers, producers, engineers, the folks at Qua’s Eye Graphix, Beanstudio and tech/HD sound specialists are committed to the music and the art of sound. Writing in the Folk and Acoustic Music Exchange, Mark S. Tucker said this about UR’schief mixing and mastering engineer, “… Jim (DeSalvo) is the engineer, and Jim’s capture of everything is arresting: clear, lucid, adroitly attuned to shifting focal depths, never at a loss, providing everything this work needed to entablature itself with zero ambivalence.”

Unique ensembles like Matt Lavelle’s 16 piece 12 Houses, Harmolodic Monk, Pat Hall’s Bill Evans Project, Sumari, Fulminate Trio, Julie Lyon Quintet and Crossings. Innovators like percussionist/drummer Tom Cabrera bring powerful transcultural elements, widening UNSEEN RAIN’s sonic landscapes. UR’s steadily growing catalog includes records by important artists including Chris Kelsey, Lewis Porter, John Pietaro, Steve Cohn, Bob Rodriquez, Blaise Siwula, Michael Evans, Jack DeSalvo, Joris Teepe, Joel Shapira, Ken Filiano, Anders Nilsson, Lee Marvin, Krestin Osgood and many others.

Unseen Rain’s specially priced Bootleg Series features complete, unedited, authorized live sets featuring Unseen Rain artists recorded by Gene Gaudette.
Honoring the impact that the LP album cover had in its heyday, Qua’s Eye Graphix creates artwork panels, with titles, credits and tracklistings that are included with the music downloads and featured on CD packages and LP covers.

UR’s sister label is foUR Records – friends of UNSEEN RAIN. foUR exists to create a forum for important recordings that were produced independently of the UR staff. Artists on foUR include visionary guitarist/composer Dom Minasi, Chicago-based drummer Jimmy Bennington and Twin Cities guitarist Joel Shapira.

————-
press contact: New Masses Media Relations
John Pietaro (646) 599-0060NewMassesMedia@gmail.comwww.DissidentArts.com

Media Contact
Jim Eigo

Jazz Promo Services
272 State Route 94 South #1
Warwick, NY 10990-3363
Ph: 845-986-1677 / Fax: 845-986-1699
Cell / text: 917-755-8960
Skype: jazzpromo
jim@jazzpromoservices.com
www.jazzpromoservices.com

“Specializing in Media Campaigns for the music community, artists, labels, venues and events.”

Canadian Contact
Glenda Rush, Publicist
mobile: (514) 591-5406, off/bur: (514) 276-6870
glendavivo@sympatico.ca Vivo Musique Int’l

 

TOM CABRERA

11149471_10206236223172739_238321096448640940_n Tom Cabrera’s Unseen Rain recordings include Julie (UR9957) with the Julie Lyon Quintet,  the trios Lion Hearted (UR9980) and Sumari (UR9962) and his duo with the JLQ’s guitarist Jack DeSalvo have released several albums, among them are Tales of Coming Home (UR9986), Libra Moon (UR9978) and Juniper (UR9966). Soon to be released is Rocco John Iacovone’s Embrace The Change (UR9947) featuring Tom Cabrera on drums and Julie Lyon’s next album is in the works.

In addition to being an incomparable jazz drummer, Cabrera is an adept world percussionist, often adding to the proceedings instruments from all over the planet, particularly the middle-east.

A Native of Long Island, NY, drummer and multi-percussionist Tom Cabrera began his career in local rock, folk-rock and country bands, but his love of jazz percolated and took over his music making. Early on both a musician and visual artist/painter, Tom was drawn into the world of graphic arts but music soon took over his life and he became a mainstay on the Hudson Valley NY scene.

Cabrera relocated to Orlando, FL, but not before acquiring a frame drum, an event that would prove auspicious to his future work. In Florida Tom gigged constantly, establishing himself as one of the most respected players on the jazz scene there. After meeting his future wife, singer Julie Lyon, they went on to form the Julie Lyon Quartet, a swinging ensemble and released their live album Between Then and Now.

Tom and Julie pulled up stakes, settled back up in the New York metropolitan area and assembled a quintet of remarkable musicians for their Unseen Rain Records release Julie (UR9957).

Tom can be contacted HERE

Additional Recordings featuring Tom Cabrera

TOM CABRERA on UNSEEN RAIN

Tom Cabrera, frame drum and percussion Jack DeSalvo, guitar
Tom Cabrera, frame drum and percussion
Jack DeSalvo, guitar

TALES OF COMING HOME – TOM CABRERA, JACK DeSALVO (UR9986)
CD Quality FLAC Download- $9.99
mp3 320 k (Recommended for iTunes users) – 8.99

Jack DeSalvo (mandola, cello, classical, electric, and 12-string slide guitars)  Tom Cabrera (bodhrán, tar, riq, doumbek, bass drum, cymbals, bells)
Jack DeSalvo (mandola, cello, classical, electric, and 12-string slide guitars)
Tom Cabrera (bodhrán, tar, riq, doumbek, bass drum, cymbals, bells)

JUNIPER – JACK DeSALVO, TOM CABRERA
CD Quality Apple Lossless Download – $9.99
mp3 320 k (Recommended for iTunes users) Download – 8.99
mp3 VBR Download

JACK DeSALVO – mandola, cello, guitar, HERB KLOSS – flute, alto flute, TOM CABRERA – frame drums, tombak,riq, darbuka, percussion
JACK DeSALVO – mandola, cello, guitar, HERB KLOSS – flute, alto flute, TOM CABRERA – frame drums, tombak,riq, darbuka, percussion
LION HEARTED – JACK DeSALVO, HERB KLOSS, TOM CABRERA
High Definition Apple Lossless Download – $10.99   
High Definition FLAC Download – $10.99
CD Quality Apple Lossless Download – $9.99
CD Quality FLAC Download- $9.99
mp3 320 k (Recommended for iTunes users) – 8.99

On their second album for UNSEEN RAIN, Tom Cabrera and Jack DeSalvo provide a global environment for their virtuosic, improvised renderings of deep, passionate music featuring an amazing collection of instruments, including frame drums, mandola, riq, cello, tombak, guitar and darbuka. The result is crystalline beauty, as rare as a Libra Moon.
On their second album for UNSEEN RAIN, Tom Cabrera and Jack DeSalvo provide a global environment for their virtuosic, improvised renderings of deep, passionate music featuring an amazing collection of instruments, including frame drums, mandola, riq, cello, tombak, guitar and darbuka. The result is crystalline beauty, as rare as a Libra Moon.
LIBRA MOON – JACK DeSALVO (UR9978)

UNSEEN RAIN is a visionary record label offering jazz and improvised music by contemporary innovators. UR is focused on high production values and recognizes the entire process surrounding a recording as art.

UR recordings are available in a number of formats, High Definition FLAC, CD quality FLAC, Apple Lossless and maximum quality mp3 (320k) as well as select titles on CD and soon, audiophile quality LPs.

UNSEEN RAIN’s community of players, composers, producers, engineers, the folks at Qua’s Eye Graphix, Beanstudio and tech/HD sound specialists are committed to the music and the art of sound. Writing in the Folk and Acoustic Music Exchange, Mark S. Tucker said this about  UR’s chief mixing and mastering engineer, “… Jim (DeSalvo) is the engineer, and Jim’s capture of everything is arresting: clear, lucid, adroitly attuned to shifting focal depths, never at a loss, providing everything this work needed to entablature itself with zero ambivalence.”

Unique ensembles like Matt Lavelle’s 16 piece 12 Houses, Harmolodic Monk, Pat Hall’s Bill Evans Project, Sumari, Fulminate Trio, Julie Lyon Quintet and Crossings. Innovators like percussionist/drummer Tom Cabrera bring powerful transcultural elements, widening UNSEEN RAIN’s sonic landscapes. UR’s steadily growing catalog includes records by important artists including Chris Kelsey, Lewis Porter, John Pietaro, Steve Cohn, Bob Rodriquez, Blaise Siwula, Michael Evans, Jack DeSalvo, Joris Teepe, Joel Shapira, Ken Filiano, Anders Nilsson, Lee Marvin, Krestin Osgood and many others.

Unseen Rain’s specially priced Bootleg Series features complete, unedited, authorized live sets featuring Unseen Rain artists recorded by Gene Gaudette.

Honoring the impact that the LP album cover had in its heyday, Qua’s Eye Graphix creates artwork panels, with titles, credits and tracklistings that are included with the music downloads and featured on CD packages and LP covers.

UR’s sister label is foUR Records – friends of UNSEEN RAIN. foUR exists to create a forum for important recordings that were produced independently of the UR staff. Artists on foUR include visionary guitarist/composer Dom Minasi, Chicago-based drummer Jimmy Bennington and Twin Cities guitarist Joel Shapira.

 

 

JACK DeSALVO, HERB KLOSS, TOM CABRERA – LIONHEARTED (UR9980)

Seattle-based Herb Kloss‘ gorgeous flute sound is united with the vast transcultural percussion pallet of Tom Cabrera and Jack DeSalvo‘s mandola, cello and guitar for a genre-transcending recording rooted in jazz, classical and folk. The result is extraordinary music.

Jack DeSalvo – mandola, cello, classical guitar/ Herb Kloss – flute, alto flute/ Tom Cabrera – frame drums, riq, tombak, darbuka, percussion

LISTEN HERE PURCHASE HERE Watch video from recording session HERE

Lion Hearted

×